first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now If you were in your buyer’s position right now, what would you do?Would you buy what you are trying to sell them? Do you believe that what you are selling is absolutely, unequivocally going to help your buyer produce the results that they need right now? If you were your buyer, would you be willing to bet the farm on that decision?If you were your buyer, would you trust the advice that you are giving them? Would you believe that the person selling (that’s you) has the business acumen and situational knowledge to know what the best course of action is? Would you believe that they are a subject matter expert with advice worth taking? Would you be 100% confident that you have the right partner in front of you?If you were in your buyer’s shoes, would you believe that the person sitting across from you cares about you and your problem enough to trust them with your business? Would you believe that the solution they put in front of you was exactly what you need, or would you wonder if it was really what they need to sell? Would you worry that the person selling you might disappear after they make the sale?Would you have what you need to justify a decision to buy from you? If asked, would you be willing to defend a decision to buy the solution you recommend and defend the decision to buy it from you? Would you have the evidence you need to justify that decision to challenges from within your company? Would you be defenseless and embarrassed by the fact that you can’t describe the reasons you should choose the salesperson and their solution over all others?last_img read more

first_imgThe Assembly on the last day of its three-day special sitting on Monday unanimously passed the Maharashtra Goods and Services Tax Act, 2017, with Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis calling it a historic step. Finance Minister Sudhir Munguntiwar claimed that though the Centre has a provision of compensating the State for the next five years, it will be in such a position that it may not even require the compensation after two-three years. Earlier, Mr. Munguntiwar participated in a day-long discussion on the Bill On Sunday, the Opposition slammed the BJP and the Shiv Sena on issues ranging from demonetisation to financial indiscipline.Thanking the members for passing the Bill, Mr. Fadnavis said just like VAT, which added wealth to the treasury, the GST too will be beneficial.last_img

first_imgNear total shutdown in Darjeeling hills West Bengal Chief minister Mamata Banerjee on Monday urged all concerned parties and stakeholders to attend an all-party meeting called by the State government in Siliguri on June 22 on the prevailing situation in Darjeeling.Urging the people to maintain peace, she said, “Violence cannot be a solution to any problem and only talks can solve it.”Also Read  “Though I will not be there, other ministers have been given the responsibility to hold the meeting,” Ms. Banerjee told reporters at the airport before leaving for Netherlands to speak on the occasion of UN Public Service Day on June 23.She accused the Gorkha Janmukti Morcha (GJM) of hatching a “conspiracy to divide the State”.The GJM had on Saturday ruled out any discussion with the West Bengal government.“We are ready for talks with the Centre, but the agenda has to be only Gorkhaland,” GJM Darjeeling MLA Amar Singh Rai had said.last_img read more

first_imgWriter and cultural activist Ganesh Devy said on Monday that the government at the Centre is determined to wipe out all opposition. Mr. Devy was speaking at the centenary memorial lecture of advocate Pandurang Mulgaonkar. Mr. Devy, president of Dakshinaayan Abhiyan, a movement that aims to forge solidarity between all progressive forces, said: “In the current political environment, political parties are not able to fulfill their traditional function of absorbing the discontent of the people and conveying it to the government.” He said the Centre had also not spared members of the civil society.Mr. Devy claimed that the media had also refused to play its traditional role of conveying the anxieties of people to the powers that be. “Today, the media appears to be speaking what the government wants it to speak. It is as if the people do not exist. The media stands as the wall between the government and people.” Mr. Devy added, “The electronic media has started barking, shouting and scolding us rather than speaking to us.” Mr. Devy claimed there was a deliberate breakdown of institutions in the country. “Whether they are commissions, statutory organisations, institutions or academics, all of them are being completely disabled and made dysfunctional.”‘Attack on intellect’Mr. Devy also said that there was an attack being carried out on intellect. “This attack on intellect is visible in universities. Conductors of intellect such as books and individuals who seem to play the traditional role of thinkers and writers who question the shape of things are being attacked.” He said the times when freedom of expression is threatened was “neither the end of the world nor this was the post-truth era”.last_img read more

first_imgTwo months after the Chennai-based Intellectual Property Office reached a conclusion that the “rasgulla” had its geographical origin in West Bengal, a trust based in Jajpur district and another individual on Monday moved a PIL in the Orissa High Court, seeking a direction to the authority concerned to withdraw the tag from West Bengal.The petitioners — Punya Utkal Trust and Santosh Kumar Sahoo of Jankia in Khurda district — also urged the High Court to direct the Odisha government to stake claim to the GI tag for Rasagola as the famous sweet had its origin in the State. “The sweet is also associated with the Jagannath culture and is being offered as prasad to the Trinity for over 400 years now,” the petition said. The petitioners assailed the “inaction” of the State of Odisha in taking needful steps for applying and obtaining GI registration of Rasagola as per the Geographical Indications of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act of 1999.last_img read more

first_imgPanaji: A Division Bench of the Bombay High Court comprising Justices Nitin Jamdar and Prithviraj Chavan on Tuesday asked the Chief Secretary of Goa Dharmendra Sharma to submit a report on his investigation into the complaint over the ₹51-lakh food scam at the BRICS summit, 2016. The court said the report should include suggestions as to how the working conditions of the Goa Police can be improved and proper care be taken.It adjourned to June 11 the hearing of a petition filed by the Chief Secretary and Director General of Police challenging the jurisdiction of the Goa State Human Rights Commission (GSHRC) to order an investigation into the food scam.Acting on a complaint filed by activist lawyer Aires Rodrigues, the GSHRC, on December 14, 2017 had asked the Chief Secretary to submit a detailed report within 45 days of conducting a thorough inquiry and fixing responsibility in the case.On January 25 this year, the Chief Secretary in his reply to the GSHRC said the inquiry had been initiated and statements of police officials have been recorded with four witnesses already examined. He sought four more weeks to complete the inquiry and submit his report.This is the second time the Chief Secretary and DGP have moved the High Court seeking to quash the BRICS food scam proceedings. On August 21, 2017, a division bench comprising Justices Gautam Patel and Nutan Sardessai while declining to quash the proceedings had asked the GSHRC to make it clear whether it recommends an inquiry or investigation and to specify the parameters.Mr. Rodrigues, in his complaint to the GSHRC on October 14, 2016, had submitted that the ₹ 51,60,000 contract was given to a local caterer for supply of food to police personnel posted on duty for the BRICS 2016 summit but that the contract was sub-let to a roadside contractor who clandestinely prepared the food in unhygienic conditions.The complaint also said the authorities had failed to make proper arrangements including food, water and toilet facilities for the police personnel and consequently, had neglected to cater to their fundamental rights.On October 18, 2016, the GSHRC directed that no payments should be released to the caterer pending inquiry into the episode.last_img read more

first_imgThe Patna High Court on Tuesday freed a girl who was locked up by her father at his residence at Khagaria in Bihar for the last several days, objecting to her relationship with a Supreme Court lawyer.The court directed Patna-based Chanakya National Law University (CNLU) to accommodate the 24-year-old law graduate at its guest house. The girl had graduated from the CNLU and was practising in the Supreme Court. The court said she was free to meet anyone during her stay at the CNLU guest house and ordered the Patna police to provide her security. The identity of the girl and her father should be protected.It set the next date of hearing for July 12.A division bench of the Patna High Court comprising Chief Justice Rajendra Menon and Justice Rajeev Ranjan Prasad had taken suo motu cognisance of a report published in the legal news portal Bar & Bench on June 22 and directed the Patna police to produce the girl in court on Tuesday. She was brought to the chambers of the Chief Justice on Tuesday afternoon, where she narrated her ordeal.The court appointed advocate Anukriti Jaipuriyar as amicus curiae in the matter.The report published in the legal news portal said the girl’s father, himself a judge, was unhappy with her relationship with the lawyer belonging to another caste. The girl had met the Supreme Court lawyer in Delhi during her internship in 2012.last_img read more

first_img The ATS searched a commercial space belonging to Mr. Raut in the same area and seized 12 crude bombs, two gelatin sticks, four electronic detonators, 22 non-electronic detonators, safety fuse wires, 150 gm of a white powder wrapped in a newspaper, two one-litre bottles labelled ‘poison’, 10 batteries, one six-volt battery, a cutter, a hacksaw blade, soldering equipment, three switches, two completed PCB circuits, one partially completed PCB circuit, six battery connectors, two battery containers, four relay switches, eight resistors, six transistors, lengths of wire, a multimeter, a pair of handgloves, adhesive solution and a partial hand-drawn diagram of a circuit on a sheet of paper.Mr. Raut and Mr. Kalaskar’s interrogation led the police to Mr. Gondhalekar in Pune. He was brought to Mumbai, and the three were placed under arrest and charged under the Explosive Substances Act, the Explosives Act, the Indian Penal Code and the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act. The Maharashta Anti-Terrorism Squad on Friday arrested three men for allegedly planning disruptive activities in the State.They are Vaibav Raut, 40, and Sharad Kalaskar, 25, from Nallasopara, and Sudhanwa Gondhalekar, 39, from Pune. Explosives were seized from the house of Mr. Raut, an alleged member of the Sanatan Sanstha. An ATS officer said the accused were held after tracking two mobile numbers of people “involved” in the planning.The officer said, “We tracked the numbers to Mr. Raut and Mr. Kalaskar on Thursday night after three days of verification. Eight crude bombs were found in Mr. Raut’s house, and incriminating documents, including instructional literature on the assembly of Improvised Explosive Devices, were found in Mr. Kalaskar’s house.”Also Read Ban Sanatan Sanstha: Oppn.last_img read more

first_imgThousands of farmers in Gujarat held protests seeking higher Minimum Support Price (MSP) for their crops, demanding Narmada water for irrigation and declaring their villages scarcity hit as deficit monsoon has begun to cause distress in rural Gujarat.In more than a dozen places across the state, angry farmers holding protests poured milk on roads and threw onion and garlic as their prices have slumped in the market.In Ahmedabad district’s Sanand, Gandhinagar district’s Dehgam and many other places near both cities, farmers took out protests rallies to press for their demands.Besides, seeking higher MSP and irrigation water, farmers are also demanding payment of crop insurance and increased electricity supply to irrigate their farms. Similar protests rallies were held in Amreli, Junagadh, Jamnagar, Godhara, Una, Kutiyana and other places.As per the monsoon data, Gujarat has received less than 70% of rainfall in the season, making it a deficit monsoon in a drought prone state. The state government has already declared Kutch district and half a dozen talukas as scarcity hit where subsidised fodder will be provided along with drinking water.Gujarat’s leader of opposition Paresh Dhanani on Tuesday said that more than 104 talukas in the state received less than 65 % rainfall and they all must be declared drought hit and the government must start drought relief works.In Jamnagar district, more than 3000 farmers took out a rally in Kalavad town from where Gujarat’s agriculture minister RC Faldu hail. The main demands of farmers are drinking water in villages, crop insurance for crop failure because of deficit monsoon and subsidised fodder for animals.“We are concerned about the situation and will take all necessary measures,” revenue minister Kaushik Patel said.According to a senior leader of Bhartiya Kisan Sangh (BKS), a RSS outfit, monsoon in Gujarat has been very poor and rural distress will only rise. “We have also submitted a list of demands for farmers,” he added.last_img read more

first_imgThe Punjab police Thursday said the second accused in the Amritsar grenade attack, which left three people dead and over 20 injured, will be arrested soon. Two motorcycle-borne men threw a grenade on a religious congregation on the outskirts of Amritsar on Sunday. An alleged operative of militant organisation Khalistan Liberation Force (KLF), identified as Bikramjit Singh (26) was arrested on Tuesday in connection with the attack. The second accused has been identified as Avtar Singh. Senior Superintendent of Police Amritsar (Rural) Parmpal Singh said Avtar Singh will be nabbed soon as various police teams are looking for him. He said Avtar Singh’s father, Gurdyal Singh, had deserted the Indian Army after Operation Blue Star in 1984. Mediapersons visiting Avtar Singh’s house in Ajnala town’s Chak Misri Khan village found numerous pictures of slain militant leader Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale pasted on walls. Bikramjit Singh’s mother, Sukhwinder Kaur, expressed shock over his arrest and claimed her son was innocent. According to police, Bikramjit Singh was driving the motorcycle while Avtar Singh hurled the grenade at the gathering.last_img read more

first_imgAs many as 67% and 60% voters cast their ballot in the Ahmednagar and Dhule municipal elections respectively on Sunday, the State Election Commission (SEC) said.“The estimated polling figures are based on the figures obtained when the voting was concluded. The final figures will be out late,” said an SEC official.J.S. Saharia, State Election Commissioner, said in the statement, “Ahmednagar Municipal Corporation held elections for 68 seats in 17 wards while in Dhule, the voting took place for 73 seats. Election to one seat was unanimous, hence voting was not held.” The counting of the votes will begin at 10 a.m. on Monday.last_img

first_imgRashtriya Janata Dal leaders on Saturday authorised party chief Lalu Prasad to select party candidates in Bihar for the upcoming Lok Sabha elections and the Assembly by-elections thereafter. He has also been authorised to stitch an alliance with like-minded parties for the upcoming LS polls.“The party’s central parliamentary board has unanimously authorised Lalu Prasad to select the candidates for the Lok Sabha elections and Assembly bypolls thereafter… besides, the party chief has also been authorised to hold parleys with like-minded parties to find out the possibilities and give a final shape to the alliance for the Lok Sabha polls,” RJD Rajya Sabha MP and national spokesperson Manoj Jha told media persons.The party’s central parliamentary board meeting was preceded by another meeting of the State units of Bihar and Jharkhand held at the official residence of former Chief Minister Rabri Devi at 10, Circular Road, in Patna.‘No Holi this year’ The party has also decided to stay away from Holi celebrations this year to show solidarity with the families of those killed in the Pulwama terror attack last month, said Mr. Jha.Lalu Prasad is currently serving prison sentences in Ranchi in several fodder scam cases and taking medical treatment at the Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences. RJD and its alliance leaders visit him regularly. Meanwhile, on seat-sharing among the Magathbandhan (Grand Alliance) constituents, Mr. Jha said, “All is well and everything is on the right track.”last_img read more

first_img NOAA The first American woman to walk in space has been tapped to be the new head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). President Barack Obama yesterday nominated Kathryn Sullivan, currently NOAA’s acting administrator, to fill the post vacated in February by marine scientist Jane Lubchenco.If confirmed by the Senate, as expected, Sullivan will oversee a $5 billion agency with wide responsibilities, including operating weather satellites, monitoring ocean conditions, and regulating fisheries. The agency has been plagued in recent years by budget overruns and delays in several major satellite projects. Those problems have threatened the health of other programs as NOAA’s budgets have stagnated.Early reaction to the pick is positive. Sullivan, who has doctorate in geology, “is a very capable and accomplished administrator,” says Robert Gagosian, president of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, a nonprofit alliance of marine and atmospheric science groups in Washington, D.C. “She has been a stalwart supporter of ocean, atmospheric, and weather observations emphasizing the importance of a strong foundation for scientific research.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Sullivan “brings a unique breadth of knowledge and diverse experience, which are commensurate with the extensive scope of NOAA’s mission,” says Tom Bogdan, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. “She will enjoy respect and strong support from the academic and commercial sectors of the enterprise.”Sullivan, 61, has been an assistant secretary at the Department of Commerce, NOAA’s parent department, since 2011, overseeing the agency’s fleet of Earth-observing instruments and weather prediction programs. It is her second stint at the agency: She served as NOAA’s chief scientist from 1993 to 1996.She’s best known for being one of the first six women selected by NASA for astronaut training in 1978. She flew on three shuttle missions during a 15-year NASA career, including the trip that delivered the Hubble Space Telescope.Prior to coming to Commerce, Sullivan spent more than a decade in Ohio, directing a math and science education think tank at Ohio State University and leading the Ohio Center of Science and Industry. She also served as a member of the National Science Board, which oversees the National Science Foundation, from 2004 to 2010. Sullivan earned her doctorate in geology from Dalhousie University in Canada in 1978. Kathryn Sullivanlast_img read more

first_imgBARCELONA, SPAIN—Plans to build a particle accelerator and neutron source in Spain’s Basque Country have come to a sudden halt. The governing board of the European Spallation Source (ESS)-Bilbao has removed the project’s scientific director, Javier Bermejo, a neutron scattering researcher at the Institute for the Structure of Matter in Madrid, and did not renew the contract of ESS-Bilbao’s executive director, retiring physicist Joan Bordas. In a statement, the board said the facility needs “an analysis and new impetus.” The moves appear to mark another turning point in a long-standing debate over whether ESS-Bilbao should be a freestanding facility primarily serving Spain, or mostly an R&D test bed serving a Europe-wide spallation source set to be built in Sweden.ESS-Bilbao was formally launched in 2009, after Spain lost a bid to host the European Spallation Source, a $2.4 billion, high-power neutron facility that is anticipated to be fully operational in Lund, Sweden, by 2025. Soon after European research ministers selected Sweden to host the ESS, the Spanish and Swedish science ministers signed a memorandum of understanding pledging that “Spain and Sweden would work together, and that there would be a significant presence in Bilbao,” says Colin Carlile, who led the Swedish bid and was director-general of ESS until last February. The Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation committed $240 million to developing a facility in Bilbao that would provide components and serve as a technology test bed for the Lund accelerator, in exchange for a 10% share in the ownership of ESS.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Bermejo, who was appointed ESS-Bilbao’s scientific director in late 2009, says that he has long seen the deal, “which gave all the control of the Spanish money to Lund,” as a missed opportunity. In the past few years, his team at ESS-Bilbao has drawn up plans for a more ambitious facility that he argues would yield better returns to the Basque region. “Spain has been contributing substantially to large-scale installations for about 30 years, without having any real laboratory [developed] to provide anything more complex than … bits and pieces of equipment,” Bermejo says. “That’s the situation we wanted to reverse.” In addition to developing accelerator components for Lund, ESS-Bilbao set out to build its own light-ion linear accelerator and neutron source for local accelerator physicists and beam users.These grander aspirations ruffled feathers in Sweden. According to Carlile, scientists and engineers developing ESS in Lund have had an increasingly difficult time tapping into Spain’s industrial capability and beam user community. With ESS-Bilbao not living up to its 2009 commitment to channel their efforts toward Lund, the Spanish scientists and industrialists “chose to carry out research projects and to supply equipment at other international facilities,” Carlile explains.Adding a layer of complexity, the same dilemma—whether a country should invest in access to a large international facility or build its own center to satisfy local needs—was also at play between Spain’s central government and the Basque government. In 2009, the two parties agreed to equally foot the $240 million bill for building up ESS-Bilbao. Bermejo says that would have covered construction costs at the University of the Basque Country and the facility’s operations through 2022. But what direction the Bilbao facility will take is now up in the air. At a press conference on 30 August, the Basque president, Iñigo Urkullu, reiterated his support for a neutron source in Bilbao. Meanwhile, Spain’s competitiveness ministry, which now oversees science and innovation, has opened talks with Sweden on redirecting ESS-Bilbao to the original agreement.Some Spanish neutron physicists would like to see a spallation source in the Basque Country. “This initiative was a breakthrough, not only for the Spanish neutron community, but also for a more general scientific community in Spain,” writes Jesús Blanco, a condensed-matter physicist at the University of Oviedo, in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. In a July 2012 report, ESS-Bilbao’s scientific advisory board concluded that ESS-Bilbao would have a niche as a standalone facility, and called for a revised memorandum of understanding.Others disagree. Javier Campo, a physicist at the Materials Science Institute of Aragon in Zaragoza and chair of the Spanish Society of Neutron Techniques, says that the Spanish neutron community has its current needs largely met by the neutron source at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, and wants to participate in building the next big machine. He believes that ESS-Bilbao’s budget and its scientific know-how are insufficient to compete with existing sources in Europe, especially with ESS Lund once it’s built. Because ESS-Bilbao’s funding was meant to be Spain’s contribution to ESS Lund, and because no intergovernmental funding agreement has been signed for the European facility, ESS-Bilbao’s divergent plans were threatening to “torpedo the European panorama,” Campo says.Serving Lund’s needs would allow ESS-Bilbao to gain experience and eventually carve out its own niche in Europe, Campo adds. “That would be the ideal scenario.”last_img read more

first_imgThe U.S. scientific community stands to lose one of its staunchest congressional supporters—and occasional harshest critic—after Representative Frank Wolf (R-VA) announced today that he is retiring from Congress at the end of 2014.The 74-year-old Wolf, who was first elected in 1980, is now the chairman of a spending panel that oversees the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and the Department of Commerce. Over the years, he has used that powerful position to advocate for increased federal support for research, improved science education, and the importance of technology and innovation to bolster the U.S. economy. He was one of four legislators who requested the wildly influential 2005 National Academies report on how to strengthen U.S. science, Rising Above the Gathering Storm. It led to the 2007 America COMPETES Act, which helped bolster political support for increased research spending.Wolf’s expansive vision for NSF once included a proposal to create a $1 billion prize to address important societal needs, funded by the private sector but managed by the agency’s renowned system of peer review. The idea never became a reality, but it captured his belief in the value of science. It also addressed his ongoing concerns about the need to curb overall government spending and shrink the massive federal debt.  Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)At the same time, Wolf has been a sharp critic of what he regards as the U.S. government’s naivety toward China. A passionate defender of human rights and religious freedom, he was appalled by that country’s civil rights record and viewed any scientific collaboration with China as misguided—as well as an open invitation to economic espionage. In 2011, for example, he inserted language into a spending bill that blocked the White House and NASA from carrying out any joint activities with China. That language remains in effect, although it has been modified to allow cooperative efforts that the president deems to be in the national interest.Those stances leave space scientists with mixed feelings about Wolf’s departure. “He was a friend to the planetary community,” says Mark Sykes of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona, noting that Wolf pushed back against budget cuts that NASA has sought to make to its planetary science budget in the last 2 years. At the same time, Wolf’s aggressive efforts to keep Chinese nationals out of NASA facilities angered many space researchers. “It’s been rather difficult working with our Chinese colleagues because of his strictures,” says a university astronomer who did not wish to be named.In his statement to the press, Wolf cited his religious beliefs as the driving force for his decision not to seek reelection in November 2014. “As a follower of Jesus, I am called to work for justice and reconciliation, and to be an advocate for those who cannot speak for themselves,” Wolf said. “I plan to focus my future work on human rights and religious freedom – both domestic and international – as well as matters of the culture and the American family.”The rules of his own party may also have played a part in his decision. Although he has been reelected repeatedly by comfortable margins to a district in northern Virginia that has become increasingly purple, Wolf would no longer have served as chair of the Commerce, Justice, and Science appropriations subcommittee in 2015 because of a 6-year limit imposed by the Republican leadership. He is the longest-serving member of the Virginia delegation and the second most senior Republican on the full Appropriations Committee.With reporting by Yudhijit Bhattacharjee.last_img read more

first_imgIt must be hard for mama loggerhead turtles. After their eggs hatch, their little offspring scurry down the beach, where many of them are snapped up by hungry birds. Even more get eaten by fish. To top it off, the survivors promptly head out to sea and vanish. They never write; they never call.Now, researchers have published the first satellite tracking data from young sea turtles, charting a leisurely voyage under the sun. The youngsters idly float north along the Gulf Stream, then head toward the Azores. Along the way, they spend most of their time riding the waves, and the sun helps raise their body temperature. “The data from this handful of turtles could lead to some really important developments” in understanding turtle populations, says Nathan Putman, a turtle biologist at Oregon State University, Corvallis.The early life of loggerheads and other sea turtles used to be called “the lost years,” because no one knew exactly where they went. But over decades, researchers pieced together the animals’ natural history from ship observations, the pattern of ocean currents, and other data. More recently, other scientists have studied isotopes from turtle tissue to analyze their diet and past locations and created computer simulations of their journey. The basic picture is this: Hatchlings head out to sea to avoid fish, sharks, and other predators. Once off the continental shelf, they eventually end up in a current, called the North Atlantic subtropical g. A few years later, they come back to their birthplaces on the East Coast of the United States.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Satellite tags have helped researchers track adult turtles. But the brick-sized transmitters were too big for young turtles. As the technology became smaller, marine biologist Katherine Mansfield of the University of Central Florida, Orlando, was able to use transmitters the size of smartphones. Solar cells helped reduce the size and weight by requiring fewer batteries. Mansfield and her colleagues collected 17 loggerhead hatchlings, each about 3 to 4 centimeters in diameter, from beaches in southeast Florida. They raised them in the lab until they were 3 to 9 months old—big enough to glue on the transmitters—and released them from a boat about 18 kilometers offshore.The transmitters survived between 27 and 220 days, during which some turtles roamed as far as 4300 kilometers, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. As expected, the turtles all headed north with the Gulf Stream, then most turned eastward around Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. The paths were consistent with what Putman’s computer models had predicted. The turtles weren’t single-mindedly heading toward the Azores, but looping around in small eddies and trying to avoid the coldest water. They also spent almost all of their time on the surface, and Mansfield suspects that this is to help stay warm. “It’s kind of a common sense thing,” Mansfield says. (They may also be waiting to develop the lung capacity for diving.)Seven turtles ventured into the Sargasso Sea, inside the gyre. In addition to hosting crustaceans and other food, the dark plant matter there absorbs warmth from the sun. The transmitters showed that the temperature around the turtle shell was 4°C to 6°C warmer than otherwise expected. “They’re absorbing a lot of sunlight,” Mansfield says. That’s exciting other turtle researchers. “This is the first data to document the thermal benefits of surface living for oceanic juvenile sea turtles,” says Alan Bolten of the Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research at the University of Florida in Gainesville.The results are a “fairly clean and clear demonstration” of where loggerheads go while young, Putman says. And by showing how temperature can vary, they raise the question of how various migration paths might affect turtle growth and even population dynamics, he adds. For example, turtles that get to the warmth of the Azores might mature more quickly than those that hang out in cooler waters elsewhere. Bolten cautions that the turtles in the study are bigger than hatchlings, but Mansfield says she expects their movements would be similar.last_img read more

first_imgIn the wake of several high-profile laboratory safety incidents involving smallpox, anthrax, and dangerous flu strains, the U.S. government is planning to ask federally funded laboratories to pause all work involving “high-consequence” pathogens for 24 hours in order to inventory stocks, according to groups that represent research universities. (Update, 27 August: This is partly incorrect, a source familiar with the matter informed ScienceInsider after this story had been posted; click here for an update.)“Essentially, what the government will request is a short term on the order of 24 hours suspension of research involving high-consequence pathogens in order to allow institutional lab personnel to take stock of what pathogens they have stored in freezers, cold rooms, etc.,” reads a memo distributed to universities today and signed by Carol Blum of the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR) in Washington, D.C.Also, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today that September will be “National Biosafety Stewardship Month.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The stand-down directive is expected to come soon from the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the memo states, and be delivered to labs through funding agencies. The exact language of the OSTP memo is not yet known. Several agencies, including the Department of Veteran Affairs, appear to have already begun the process. In what appears to be a related move, NIH issued a notice urging institutions to take heed of the recent biosafety incidents. “Recent reports of lapses in biosafety practices involving Federal laboratories have served to remind us of the importance of constant vigilance over our implementation of biosafety standards,” the notice states. It says that in September, NIH and other federal agencies will observe National Biosafety Stewardship Month. Their labs will inventory their collections of infectious agents and toxins and review biosafety protocols and training procedures. NIH’s grantee institutions “are encouraged” to do the same. NIH’s notice comes in the wake of a Monday statement from the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), which represents many researchers working with dangerous pathogens, which called on its members to conduct a similar inventory.Ron Atlas, a past president of ASM, said in a statement: “The community wants to act responsibly and looks forward to the public release of the [OSTP] memo to clear up any uncertainties. But even before the official release of the OSTP memo the ASM has recommended that its members take prudent steps to know which cultures they possess and where they are located. It is also incumbent on the community to review their biosafety procedures and to ensure that all laboratories have a culture of biosafety compliance that is critical for protecting laboratory workers and the broader public.”Here is the full text of today’s COGR memo:There has been a lot of speculation about a government-wide biosafety stand down following the Department of Veterans Affairs sending notices to its own research institutions on the topic. Our colleagues at the Association of American Universities (AAU) discussed the subject with senior Administration officials on Tuesday, August 26, and received permission to provide additional information to clarify the issue under consideration by the Federal government for the research community. Please note: the following Q&A is not an official communications from the government but based on notes from the discussion with AAU staff.*What is the stand-down*? Essentially, what the government will request is a short term on the order of 24 hours suspension of research involving high-consequence pathogens in order to allow institutional lab personnel to take stock of what pathogens they have stored in freezers, cold rooms, etc. This is prompted by some recent, high profile biohazard stories, such as the discovery of smallpox in cold storage at NIH. This would apply to research conducted by and funded by federal research agencies. With the focus on high-consequence pathogens the impact, nonetheless, should be focused on a known group of labs.*Where does this directive come from*? The directive would come from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), through the research agencies, via a memorandum. OSTP had anticipated issuing the memorandum last week but that action is delayed to allow for additional consultation with the Federal agencies. OSTP anticipates the memo will be released soon, at which point labs and institutions may be contacted by multiple agencies about the stand-down. In light of the likely multiple calls for a stand-down, we encourage institutions to coordinate the activity on campus to avoid miscommunications.*Does this only apply to Select Agents*? No, because all institutions using Select Agents and Toxins should already be keeping track of those pathogens. Ideally, the federal agencies would ask institutions to take stock of all pathogens stored in laboratories. However, they are giving latitude to the scientific community to identify which pathogens, in particular, labs and institutions should be inventoried.*How is this enforceable*? *What are the consequences for non-compliance*? In short, its not enforceable and there are no consequences for non-compliance. This request is deliberately more about best practices in lab management than it is about imposing new regulations on the community. As of now, the government cannot force any individual or institution to go through this process. Instead, the government is seeking voluntary compliance in a timely manner consistent with the proper management of pathogens. In that vein, the American Society of Microbiology is calling on its members to go through a similar inventory exercise: https://www.asm.org/index.php/publicpolicy-2/statements-testimony/99-policy/policy/93059-freezer-8-14.Institutions should consider revisiting policies and procedures for closing out labs when investigators transfer to other institutions, retire or change research focus. Often, pathogens are left behind for the use of post-doctoral fellows and graduates to complete work in progress. With the departure of fellows and students, pathogens languish forgotten or ignored in freezers and cold rooms. The Federal government hopes that a systematic stand-down and thorough inventory will allow institutions to identify orphaned pathogens and conduct orderly disposals of the materials. The discovery of small pox on the NIH campus was just such an event materials used by long-departed investigators and stored for a future use that never evolved.*Will this result in new policy/regulations*? That is not currently the governments intent. It is good to keep in mind that opportunities for additional biosafety/biosecurity regulations are always a possibility, as we are still expecting the next iteration of the dual use research of concern (DURC) policy which will be an institutional policy as a companion to the US Government policy for agencies already in effect and the Select Agent regulations are periodically updated. For the moment, however, this stand-down remains the sum total of government actions.When the official memo is released, or if we or AAU receive any additional information, we will keep the membership informed.With reporting by Jocelyn Kaiser.*Update, 27 August, 3:18 p.m.: This article was updated to include a comment from Ron Atlas and to clarify the source of today’s memo.*Update, 27 August, 4:58 p.m.: This article has been updated to include information on an NIH announcement.last_img read more

first_imgOn the day he was named cricketer and captain of the year at the ICC awards, Virat Kohli became the second India batsman, after Sunil Gavaskar, to scale 900 points in the Test rankings for batsmen. The India captain vaulted from 880 points to 900 following his 153 against South Africa in the Centurion Test.Gavaskar had reached 916 points after he scored a remarkable 221 in his 50th Test at the Oval in 1979. In all, Kohli is the 31st batsman to 900 points in the Test rankings. Donald Bradman leads the list with 961 points followed by current Australia captain Steven Smith (947), who has drawn comparisons with Bradman after peeling off 687 runs in the Ashes series. In terms of Test averages, Smith is placed just below Bradman.Read it at ESPN Related Itemslast_img

first_imgIndia has become the third top source market for visitor arrivals in Singapore, as the nation received 6.1 lakh visitors between January and May this year, a senior official in Singapore Tourist Board said today.The year 2017 was a record for the board as visitor arrivals from India had crossed 1 million for the third time in a row, showcasing the highest growth rate at 16 per cent in comparison with all markets, G B Srithar, Regional Director, South Asia Middle East and Africa International Group of the Board, told reporters here.Read it at Covai Post Related Itemslast_img

first_imgIn a legal victory for India, a court in the United Kingdom has cleared extradition of bookie Sanjeev Kumar Chawla, who is an accused in the 2000 match-fixing scandal.The Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Monday revised its earlier ruling and recommended to the home secretary that Chawla should be extradited to India.Read it at Outlook India Related Itemslast_img