first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Anto AkkaraPosted Jul 31, 2012 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Pradip Ravi says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Ecumenical News International, Bangalore, India] Church leaders in India’s southern Karnataka state have joined secular groups in criticizing the state government’s decision to give 170 million rupees (US$3 million) to Hindu temples that agree to pray for rain in a drought-wracked monsoon season.“Lack of rain is a worry for everyone … Let everyone pray for rain. But we cannot approve of the government spending money to conduct prayers in temples,” Bishop John S. Sadananda, head of the Karnataka Southern Diocese of the Church of South India (CSI), told ENInews on July 30.The Karnataka government, led by the BJP Hindu nationalist political party, said 34,000 Hindu temples would receive the money (an average of US$88 per temple) for prayers on July 27 and August 2. The money is for materials used in the Hindu puja prayer ritual, such as rice, flowers, coconuts, oils and decorations.“The government should have spent that money to help farmers” affected by the dry conditions, Sadananda said. Critics noted that churches and mosques were receiving no government grants for prayers.The state government has declared drought conditions in two thirds of the state. Reservoirs are drying up and farmers are unable to till the rock-hard land. The peak monsoon season runs from June to September.The federal government is also developing emergency plans to deal with the situation in places where agriculture is known as “a gamble in the rain.”Roman Catholic archbishop Bernard Moras of Bangalore, head of the Catholic church in Karnataka, directed churches to pray for rain. “The government … should have spent the taxpayers’ money to give succor to the people hit by the drought-like situation,” he said.A special Mass and adoration for rain was held on July 27 at the Catholic pilgrim center of St. Philomena’s Cathedral in Mysore. Bishop Thomas Vazhappilly of Mysore told ENInews that he has asked priests of the diocese to conduct special prayers for rain. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Comments (1) March 26, 2013 at 5:51 am Dear Mr. AkkaraAlmost all the temples are under government authority, very few are aware that in many temples daily revenues are in the range of 100,000 US$ or more. These funds are used by government and many activists allege that these are being used for non-hindu purposes.The money that Indian govt is giving back is quite pittance to the revenues earned from hindu temple. One temple in South; Tirumala Devasthanam earns about 100 Million US$, annually, which goes to the govt elected Trustee. Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In India, churches accuse state of favoring Hindu temples Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Ecumenical & Interreligious last_img read more

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 September 5, 2013 at 8:13 pm I think you ought not to have omitted the success of The Diocese of Virginia. We stand as a beacon of hope to faithful Episcopalians everywhere who worship a living God who continues to reveal truth through the power of the Holy Spirit. God is not frozen in time nor should be the church. David Veal put it well – if you want to hold tight, the go back to our beginning. It is one thing to chose to leave a church, it is another to take what belongs to the church. And, I may ask, who set you up to decide who is a heretic and crown you the arbiter of all things theological? Just asking. September 4, 2013 at 2:50 pm @Eric, Did Sarah leave? I don’t think so. Those of us like Sarah who are still in the Episcopal Church and who agree with our South Carolina Supreme Court, and apparently Texas, that neutral principles of property law be applied (which ultimately leads to the conclusion that the Dennis Canon cannot unilaterally impose a trust which might take away a parish church’s title to its property) should perhaps now be listened to by the powers that be in our Church. [Diocese of Fort Worth press release] The Rt. Rev. Rayford B. High, Jr., bishop of Fort Worth; the Standing Committee, and the Board of Trustees of the Corporation of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth are disappointed by the August 30, 2013, opinion of the Texas Supreme Court that failed to uphold the summary judgment of the 141st District Court, Tarrant County, Texas. That judgment granted the Local Episcopal Parties’ and The Episcopal Church’s Motions for Summary Judgments.  The opinion can be seen here. and the dissenting opinion can be seen here.Bishop High has issued a letter to the diocese that can be seen, which follows in full. When we have more thoroughly reviewed the opinion, the Diocese of Fort Worth may issue further statements. In the meantime we hold all Episcopalians in our prayers as well as former Bishop Iker and his colleagues, and we bid your prayers as we move forward.30 August 2013Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ,On August 30, 2013 the Texas Supreme Court issued an opinion that sent our case back to the lower court for reconsideration. While it is a disappointment not to have a definitive decision, as followers of Jesus Christ, we live in hope.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori joins me in acknowledging our disappointment and urging all of us to be gentle with one another during this trying time, with the important goal of continuing our worship of God and our ministries in this community in as uninterrupted a manner as possible.Now I, other diocesan leaders, and our legal team, including representatives of the Church and its legal team, have to make decisions about our next steps.For now, we all must don the mantle of patience and forbearance.  I ask for your prayers and urge us all to stay focused on the saving gospel of Jesus Christ in the days ahead.I remain convinced that we are right in our affirmation that we are the continuing Diocese of Fort Worth and that I am its bishop.But in the wake of this opinion, as always, we remain committed to preaching that gospel as we celebrate the sacraments, care for those in need, and strive for justice and peace. When we began this litigation in 2009, we did so as heir and steward of the legacy of generations of faithful Episcopalians.Let us move forward together with grace and love, guided by the Holy Spirit.The Rt. Rev. Rayford B. High Jr.BishopThe Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth Submit an Event Listing September 3, 2013 at 9:59 am The amount is at least 22 million. That is $22,000,000.00. Ron Caldwell says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA September 3, 2013 at 9:21 pm Reading above comments brings me back to 7th-8th grade — excluding the vocabulary. Disappointing. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR September 4, 2013 at 6:51 pm Mr. Wheeler, good question. Thanks for asking it. I would like to put in some words on this subject. The Dennis Canon was officially adopted by the Episcopal Church and placed in the Constitution and Canons of the Episcopal Church in 1979. The Diocese of South Carolina acceded to that, recognized and followed it until after Bishop Lawrence came into office (indeed the DSC fought the All Saints Waccamaw case on the basis of the Dennis Canon). The Dennis Canon explicitly states that all property is held in trust for the Episcopal diocese and the Episcopal Church. It has been the clear policy of the Episcopal Church for many years now.When local entities form a union under a constitution they forfeit sovereignty (ultimate authority) to the central body. The framers of the Constitution believed this was obviously implicit and did not need to be spelled out. Therefore, the framers did not include a statement in the Constitution forbidding secession. It was not necessary. The powers of the federal government were enumerated and binding on all the states. The states cannot pick and choose which laws to follow and not follow. Likewise, the Episcopal Church has a constitution called the Constitution and Canons. It is equally binding on all dioceses and clergy. Under the C and C, a diocese may not pick and choose which rules to follow and which to ignore. Thus Bishop Lawrence was incorrect to assert that the DSC was a “sovereign” diocese and therefore could decide to ignore or revoke any Episcopal Church canons at will. And, just because dioceses and states may have existed before the unions were created, they cannot reserve sovereignty once they take part in forming the union under the enumerated terms of the constitution. Ironically, South Carolina then as now claimed the sovereignty of the local entity over the union and went to war to prove it (Bishop Lawrence has stated repeatedly that he is at war with TEC). The Civil War settled that issue for the U.S. President Lincoln could have taken the easy way out for the short run with no bloodshed and no cost by recognizing the existence of the Confederacy, as many urged him to do, but that would have been the wrong thing to do for the long run and he knew it then as most of us now know it in hindsight. Lincoln upheld the Constitution and at tremendous cost because it was the right thing to do. I say thank God he saved the Union.The Presiding Bishop is upholding the constitution of the Episcopal Church for the same reason. We commentators on this page disagree strongly on whether she should do that. I have my opinion and I respect the rights of others to their opinions. As for me, I say the very existence of the Episcopal Church in its constituted state as we know it is at stake. The PB would be derelict in her duties if she failed to do everything in her power, as did Lincoln, to save that union. Anyone may leave the Episcopal Church anytime they wish but they may not do so in violation of the rules to which they had already agreed and cannot change unilaterally. That is why the PB will not “negotiate with departing dioceses/parish.” Rector Bath, NC Patsy West says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Grant Carson says: W T Wheeler says: September 9, 2013 at 6:02 pm Mr. Wheeler: Was it not in the U.S.’s and Lincoln’s “best interest” “to negotiate” with the Confederates in April of 1861? He could have saved the lives of 600,000 men, prevented countless wounds, and kept God only knows how much money from being wasted. Lincoln knew that a higher issue was at stake that was worth it all, the preservation of the United States as the city on the hill, the shining light in the world as the great democratic republic. The Presiding Bishop knows as well that she has the integrity of her institution to serve. If the principle is established that a diocese of the Episcopal Church can secede from the Church intact, the Episcopal Church as we know it will collapse.Now, whether the Episcopal Church should collapse is another question? I think we all know in advance where we stand on that one. Just speaking for myself, a white person who grew up in the Jim Crow South, I say thank God for the leadership the Episcopal Church has shown in the last 50 years as a champion of human rights, first for blacks, then Native Americans, women, and now LGBT people. I believe the Presiding Bishop is right to fight for her institution because it serves a higher calling for God and for man. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Jason Loller says: Episcopalians disappointed by Texas Supreme Court opinion The Rev. Patrick Bone says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group David Leedy says: Featured Jobs & Calls September 1, 2013 at 12:23 am Ugly and expensive litigation that TEC should never had initiatied. Shame on Katharine Jefferts Schori, David Boothe Beers and TEC for having initiated the suits!The departing parties never sued anyone for anything. They just wanted to keep what was theirs.Grant Kathleen Murff Whiting says: September 3, 2013 at 6:18 pm My oh my. What a cloud of witnesses. And to think this was all started by King Henry VIII of not so blessed memory.Dear Sisters and Brothers, I quote verse 9 of the beautiful hymn – “There’s a wideness in God’s mercy” . It is not a verse that, unfortunately, you will find in our hymnal. It may have been excluded because we as supposed Christians, would find too truthful and reminding us what we are not. I quote:“BUT WE MAKE HIS LOVE TOO NARROWBY FALSE LIMITS OF OUR OWN.AND WE MAGNIFY HIS STRICTNESSWITH A ZEAL HE WILL NOT OWN”. Think about it! And think about the stupidity we are putting our church and our selves through. September 3, 2013 at 11:39 pm The problem was that TEC changed and chose to force it on me—, my church, my parish, my diocese—I/We didn’t change. There was no longer a conscience clause….nothing for those of differing convictions. The majority in my church and diocese wished to remain faithful to the historical Christian faith of our fathers and mothers. There was no tolerance, no inclusiveness for those with differing opinions. I am so sorry that you, Pam, experienced this un-Christian behavior but that is not what happened in the diocese I belong to…In our diocese those churches that wished to remain TEC did with their church and their property, and our prayers and good will. In my little church there were those who disagreed with the split and they pledged their membership in an Episcopal church elsewhere but yet remain with us to worship each Sunday, and praise be we continue to worship the same Jesus and unite to expand his kingdom. Personally my decision had nothing to do with LGBT issues and everything to do with what it means to me to be a Chrisitian It had to do with the rejection of the uniqueness of Jesus Christ and the number 1 precept that makes me/us Christians is that Jesus is not “one way” but that he is “The way, the Truth and the Life.” This appears to no longer be the foundation of the Episcopal Church. As we have experienced the Christian Goodwill of TEC “inclusiveness” lifetime parishes have been forced to leave their church buildings that in many cases were built with members and/or their parents own hands and sweat and sacrifice. So sad for those churches that when there is no Episcopal congregation to replace the congregation that was forced out, the former resident Anglican Church can not even buy back the property and for those churches that no longer have congregations to support the buildings doors may shut..There are no worries TEC the property is valuable and the money will flow…Isn’t that what being a Christian is all about?Christians suing Christians…. What a great witness to Christ-like love. September 2, 2013 at 10:35 am Mr. Carson, consult the above-mentioned “Annual Litigation Summary…”, also available at accurmudgeon.blogspot.com [Jan. 8, 2013] and you will see numerous cases where the “departing parties” initiated the lawsuits against TEC, most famously in South Carolina where the Lawrence faction rather cleverly made a preemptive strike on Jan. 5 2013 that has set the stage perfectly for the state court to rule eventually in their favor. W T Wheeler says: Mike Brady says: George Elliot says: September 3, 2013 at 11:16 pm Keep what was “theirs?” Should the members of Trinity Church Wall Street be ableto keep what was “theirs?” Shame on these people, especially the clergy, for misrepresenting their actions. Just trying to “keep what was theirs!” EJ Madden says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET W T Wheeler says: September 3, 2013 at 9:09 pm If you choose to leave, you leave behind all the parts of the Church with which you no longer want to be identified. You cannot have your cake and eat it too. And if in leaving, you choose to believe differently from the Episcopal Church of 2013, come up with your own liturgy, your own prayer book, and your own hierarchy. And God be with you in your new endeavors. But please, expend your energies in building your new denomination and refrain from spiteful, mean comments which appear to take the inventory of everyone but yourself. W T Wheeler says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest August 31, 2013 at 11:39 am How much money has the TEC spent to litigate all of these cases? Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME August 31, 2013 at 11:39 am The hierarchial argument has failed. Yes, some cases were won because of the error of the judges looking into what hierarchial was. Thanks to papers and amicus briefs light has been shed on TEc’s deception. Like I saw one person describe it, there are 15 and two different explanations of what hierarchial is. You have the Catholic and the Greek Orthodox hierarchial, then you have all the rest. TEc falls in with that “rest” group. Now that the papers and the amicus brief came out, the judges can see that TEc is trying to be something it is not. It looks to me like TEc is in for a world of hurt with a lot of money lining the pockets so Schori’s lawyers. Meanwhile, they close and sell churches they took through deception. What a wonderful show of how TEc has learned to be a so called “Christian” entity through its secular existence and reality. Duane Alexander Miller says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 W T Wheeler says: David L. Veal says: September 3, 2013 at 11:17 pm We can not just allow radicals to take Episcopal Church money and property. Fr. Will McQueen says: September 4, 2013 at 11:33 pm Lincoln saved the Union by trampling all over the Constitution, and when Marylanders in their State Anthem sing “The tyrant’s heel is on thy shore, Maryland, My Maryland”, the tyrant referred to is Abraham Lincoln. The Southern States would never have ratified the Consititution had they not assumed they could withdraw from the Union. I agree that as long as you stay in the club, you are obligated to follow its rules, but the War between the States settled only which section had the power. The National Church will not negotiate with nor sell property to the seceding parishes because they don’t want a competing Episcopal congregation they can’t control. September 4, 2013 at 11:09 am @Eric: “…generations of Episcopalians have given time, talent and treasure in support of the church, with the express understanding that we are a hierarchical church, and that while people may come and go, the assets belong to the larger church.”This assertion was valid as long as the Episcopal Church was faithful to God, to the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and Sciptural truth. When TEC abandoned its faithfulness and demanded fealty to its immoral and unscriptural teachings, it was the one who “changed the rules at halftime”. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Eric Bonetti says: Doug Desper says: September 1, 2013 at 5:39 pm David,I see nothing wrong with anything you just mentioned here. George Elliot says: September 5, 2013 at 4:27 pm Yes, General Convention may be able to determine the rules of “the game”. However, the point being made is simple: the loud voices currently leading the Church have been at the forefront of the decline of this Church. Revisionists cannot – by some imputed democratic fiat – (for example) decide that marriage is not what it has always been and have any ground on which to stand except an arm-twisting canon. We are not Mormons; the canon of Scripture is not continually added to by the voice of a recognized prophet. If we represent that we are part of the catholic Church we cannot keep putting faith and practice up on the tinkering block every 3 years and have any credibility as a part of the apostolic faith. Today’s liberal progressives demand adherence to their draconian shifts of theology and practice that have no grounds, and then when people don’t sit still for it we begin to see the “me – my – mine” claims, always defending their Episcopal brand – and yet rarely cherishing the individuals that make up that brand. What’s worse, is that many of these same people are perfectly fine to decimate the Church in order for it to become smaller, more liberal, and more revisionist; all the while inviting tens of thousands of members to hit the road – or “be pruned”. What utter gall. Grant Carson says: Tags September 1, 2013 at 5:58 am Hope to see you in the US Supreme Court. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rick Bowen says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC September 3, 2013 at 11:11 pm How many Episcopalians in “your” parish were around in 1877? Press Release Service Eric Bonetti says: August 31, 2013 at 2:26 am Greetings from the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. I must say this seems like a triumph for justice. Perhaps TEC in Ft Worth will be forced to seriously think about the meaning of evangelism and church planting? Comments (58) Grant Carson says: PJ Cabbiness says: Kate Chipps says: September 4, 2013 at 9:54 pm Actually, the Diocese of Fort Worth (ACNA) has grown quite a bit in the last few years. Part of this has been because parishes, such as those of continuing churches, from outside the traditional geographic boundaries of the Diocese have petitioned to join. Part is new missions. Part is the growing number of Hispanics in Texas. (Our largest parish, and our most rapidly growing parish, not the same, are Hispanic.) We now have parishes in Oklahoma, Missouri, Louisiana and Dallas (with the agreement of the bishops of Dallas and Fort Worth), and a mission in the Diocese of Texas. September 9, 2013 at 4:13 pm Ron;Spouting off TEC’s company line of the Dennis Canon is not answering the question. Is it not in TEC’s best interest from a financial, moral, and mission perspective to negotiate? $22 million in legal fees (unofficial number due to TEC not releasing the number), empty buildings that are untenable, and a swarm of bad publicity. I almost forgot to mention TEC could have used the millions spent in litigation on MGD mission, etc… Milton Finch says: September 4, 2013 at 1:42 pm You are the “radicals” TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab September 3, 2013 at 5:04 pm Carol,I understand your anger but there is no excuse for name calling. Please stop as you make those of use who agree with you look bad. Rector Martinsville, VA September 11, 2013 at 1:29 pm Well, Ron, apparently the judge in Illinois doesn’t see it your way (TEC) at all. There is no canon that says a Diocese cannot leave. There is no canon that says a Diocese must get it’s Constitution approved by GenCon. The Dennis Canon reads, “All real and personal property held by or for the benefit of any Parish, Mission, or Congregation is held in trust for this Church [i.e., the Episcopal Church in the United States] and the Diocese thereof in which such Parish, Mission or Congregation is located. The existence of this trust, however, shall in no way limit the power and authority of the Parish, Mission or Congregation otherwise existing over such property so long as the particular Parish, Mission or Congregation remains a part of, and subject to, this Church and its Constitution and Canons.” Since there is nothing saying in TEC’s Constitution that a Diocese cannot leave and the Dennis Canon does not mention a diocese property being held in trust for TEC, I don’t see where you get that a contract was broken. September 1, 2013 at 9:52 pm Grant,I see nothing wrong with anything you just mentioned here. Much more substantive than anything that followed. Milton Finch says: Chris Walchesky says: September 2, 2013 at 11:57 am Back several years ago the current unpleasantness was dismissed by TEC leadership with divisive phrases like “they (evangelical/traditionalists in TEC) are just a few who don’t want to be with us”. Now – today – the exodus of vital, dedicated leaders, and growing parishes, and dioceses is yet again dismissed and blamed on the Holy Spirit when Presiding Bishop Jefferts-Schori tells the shrinking ELCA that perhaps the shrinking numbers in the churches are due to the Holy Spirit “pruning” the membership. This is mind-boggling. In the past decade our leaders have given thin lip service to a big, comprehensive Anglican tent of inclusion while pursuing divisive and destructive polices demanded by leftist progressives which continue to have the ongoing effect of emptying the pews. Sixty percent of our membership will not show itself on Sundays – maybe because there isn’t much to see in philosophies that deny the unique person of Jesus Christ, or which use Him as a cause celeb to inflame rivalries among the membership. In that frame of mind it appears that lawsuits are the only discourse that will be respected – and in the wake there will be a weakened Church that may never recover. It’s odd, but I just don’t hear lament from our leadership of the loss of so much of our vitality and membership – only opining that one day there will be a much leaner, smarter, more liberal and more progressive Church. How can you reason with such as that? An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Caron Hazel says: Jim Welsh says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs September 9, 2013 at 4:21 pm Kathleen,You mean TEC is not having it’s cake and eating it too by suing people for property they NEVER put one dime into? September 2, 2013 at 2:13 pm Grant, I completely agree with you. What so many fail to see is in the first cases, the conservatives naively thought they might be dealing with Christians that still had a spirit of Christianity in them. They soon found that, as those in TEc flaunt Biblical prescriptions in many areas, they too would flaunt the one where Christians should never take Christians to court. Now that Bishop Lawrence is slamming them in court, they are also famously forgetting what the rest of that verse foretells. Do not take a person to court, BECAUSE THEY MAY TURN AROUND AND TAKE MORE FROM YOU THAN YOU MAY BE COMFORTABLE GIVING UP. David Yarbrough says: September 4, 2013 at 11:03 am God’s love is not “too narrow” – but God cannot contradict Himself. When Christians speak the truth in love, it is not an unloving thing. When Christians reject Scriptural truth in favor of the norms of a heathen culture, it IS an unloving thing. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books David Yarbrough says: September 5, 2013 at 8:57 am Mr. Wheeler and Mr. Foster (above) and others. It is useful to see a constitution for what it is, a contract. That is an agreement voluntarily made by a number of parties and perhaps expanded later by additional contracting parties. Once made, the terms are binding on all signatory parties. No party, or parties, to the agreement may withdraw from or alter the terms of the contract except by mutual consent or by a mechanism specified in the contract. The U.S. Constitution has a mechanism for change, amendments, the process for which is clearly spelled out in the Constitution. The Episcopal Church’s Constitution and Canons has a mechanism too, through due process in the General Convention. It is implicit in the terms of the original contract that a state may not withdraw from the contract, the Constitution; and it is explicit that no state may alter the laws of the United States to suit itself. Likewise, no diocese may unilaterally withdraw from or alter the laws of the Episcopal Church. These are subject to the due process embedded in the C and C.Therefore, Bishop Lawrence was wrong to claim that the Diocese of South Carolina was “sovereign” vis a vis the Episcopal Church. Sovereignty rests in the Church as a whole, not divided into its separate parts. Likewise he was wrong to nullify the legally constituted canons of the Episcopal Church to which he did not agree. That was breaking the contract. It is the Presiding Bishop’s job to uphold the C and C of the Episcopal Church. That is what she is doing and that is why she will not negotiate with the secessionists. August 31, 2013 at 9:40 am Before we jump to conclusions and get too “disappointed” or “thrilled,” we should stand back and review the overall picture of Episcopal Church legal actions in the last decade. A.S. Haley, aka “The Anglican Curmudgeon,” provides a handy listing in “Annual Litigation Summary for the Episcopal Church (USA)” available at standfirminfaith.com. Although meant to throw discredit on TEC, the summary actually shows TEC’s strength. Of the five breakaway dioceses, only one has been finally settled: Pittsburgh. A trial court found in favor of TEC as did an appeal court. The PA Supreme Court refused to take the case. The settlement in Pittsburgh was a clear-cut victory for TEC. The other four dioceses are in various stages of litigation with two important cases, Ft. Worth and San Joaquin, where lower courts ruled in favor of TEC. The new decisions in SC and TX sent the cases back down to lower courts. The secessionists hope, with some reason, that “neutral principles” and property rights will prevail in the state courts giving the edge to the local entities. But looking at the Annual Litigation Summary, one finds that exactly one case has been finally settled for a breakaway group against the TEC diocese: All Saints Waccamaw [Pawleys Island, SC], and that was not appealed to the US Supreme Court. The record shows that the overwhelming majority of the 100 or so cases in the last decade have been settled in favor of TEC, most on the grounds of the rights of a hierarchical institution. We are all in for many years of ugly and expensive litigation. It took six years for TEC to get back St. Paul’s of Bakersfield, the church Mark Lawrence led out of TEC. Both sides are now digging in for the long haul. It should not have come to this. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET September 4, 2013 at 8:35 am My, my. We Christians. How we love one another. Fortunately, God makes up for our sibling rivalries by loving all His creatures–not only Christians–equally. And, “NO!” we can’t theologize Him out of it. September 3, 2013 at 5:23 pm @John Neir — Amen, brother! Rector Washington, DC David Yarbrough says: August 31, 2013 at 12:39 am Neutral principles of law governed this case. Neutral principles negate the Dennis Canon. TEC won’t appeal because the Texas decision was based upon a U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning neutral principles. If TEC appeals, it risks losing all the cases decided so far.The TEC tactic of “litigate until they capitulate” has failed on its merits. David Boothe Beers and Katherine Jefferts Schori were simply wrong, and I might add, un-Christian.Now we who paid for our churches with no help from TEC and have worshipped in them for, in my parish case, since 1877, can continue to worship without the legal threat of turning us out of our home.The only thing that could have made this decision better was for the court to order TEC to pay court costs, in the millions.Shame on TEC for initiating this litigation. Christians shouldn’t sue Christians. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ron Caldwell says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ September 4, 2013 at 9:12 pm @David: Our canons have always been clear: General Convention determines the rules of the game. That was the case when you became a member of The Episcopal Church. It was the case when I became a member. Further, general convention has, inter alia, voted to approve equality for LGBT members of the church, including ordination of LGBT clergy. Those are the rules. If you do not like those rules, so be it. But those are the rules. If you cannot live within that framework, I am sorry to see you go. But the rules of the game remain. Doug Desper says: September 13, 2013 at 3:53 pm I am a relative new-comer to the Episcopal Church. When I decided to change churches, I searched the internet and discovered “Gay Affirming” churches. In my city, San Marcos, Texas, the only church on the list was the Episcopal Church and its outreach on the TxState campus. In neighboring New Braunfels, there are no “Gay Affirming” churches at all. Not all Episcopal Churches are on the list either, but I am so happy to find a loving, open and accepting church in which to sing and worship. Change is coming for those who feel it’s somehow a family or religious value to exclude gay and lesbian people from full communion and fellowship with the church and community. Prejudice and discrimination based on sex or sexual preference is hypocritical and not Christlike, at least in my view. I very much appreciate that the Episcopal Church is not letting its property and name to be usurped by hate-filled, ignorant, sexist and homophobic congregations, while they continue spewing spiritual violence against women, gays and lesbians. Milton Finch says: September 3, 2013 at 6:10 pm @Sarah: Your claiming to be Episcopalian is no more valid than would be the case were I to assert that I am the president of the United States. The United States is the sole determinant of who the president is, and it has a system for making that decision. If you step outside that system, it logically follows that you cannot then claim a role in that system.Similarly, The Episcopal Church’s canons and general convention determine what is and is not part of our denomination. Having chosen to leave, you may assert that you are the Presiding Bishop, the Archibishop of Canterbury, or anything you wish, but saying so does not make it so.As to the issue of property ownership, generations of Episcopalians have given time, talent and treasure in support of the church, with the express understanding that we are a hierarchical church, and that while people may come and go, the assets belong to the larger church. Indeed, your diocese expressed agreed to that understanding, including the Dennis Canon, at the time of its formation. I submit that both from a legal and ethical perspective the diocese and its members gave their word and agreed to that contract. To now assert that you do not wish to adhere to that agreement is akin to playing football, discovering you are losing at halftime, and then arguing that the rules are unfair. September 4, 2013 at 10:24 am “I am proud to be a member of a church that supports women as priests & bishops; a church that welcomes Gays & Lesbians and the Bible & teachings of Christ.”You are a member of a church which openly rejects the clear teaching of that Bible on sexuality – including the teachings of Jesus, who said that his teaching changed nothing at all about the law of the Old Testament.“It should be no surprise when lawsuits are started and appeals are made..etc.” Again, clearly a rejection of scripture, which teaches that lawsuits between Christians are inappropriate.Check for the post in your own eye before you worry about the sliver in another’s. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Fr. Will McQueen says: Andrew Castiglione says: Posted Aug 30, 2013 September 9, 2013 at 2:57 pm This strand of posts misses a larger, unpleasant reality. The current schism is rapidly condemning anglicanism in any form (TEC, ACNA, etc.) to irrelevancy in North America. The leadership of both ACNA and TEC are driven by ego and the desire for power. Unfortunately, the ultimate responsibility for the current state of affairs falls on us, the laity as we have ceded too much power to the clergy over time and they have failed us bitterly. September 3, 2013 at 11:45 pm Wow,How many hungry could we feed,How many could we educate,How many could we share the saving love of Jesus Christ with Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA September 3, 2013 at 4:59 pm I have asked many who remained in TEC one question they cannot seem to answer; Why wouldn’t TEC negotiate with departing dioceses/ parishes? This would seem to benefit all involved. The departing folks would get to leave with property they paid for. TEC wouldn’t have to spend millions on litigation and be able to recover some monetary assets that they could use for their mission. Katherine Schori talks of “Fiduciary Responsibility”. Is it responsible to spends millions on litigation for property and assets TEC may not get? Evelyn Piety says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Fr. Will McQueen says: September 4, 2013 at 8:47 am I don’t think the Diocese of Ft. worth has grown in years. The prohibition ofwomen from the priesthood as their main mission is not appealing to many. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Joseph F Foster says: David Yarbrough says: Sarah Hey says: Pam Hardaway says: September 4, 2013 at 11:30 am Agreed Caron Hazel says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID George Elliot says: September 3, 2013 at 4:58 pm Imagine the impact that would have had on evangelism! September 4, 2013 at 11:14 am @Patrick:God loves all his creatures equally.God feels pain when his creatures reject the truth He has expressed through Scripture and through the life, teachings, and resurrection of His Son.God has charged us as Christians with proclaiming His truth in love – his WHOLE truth, whether or not it’s consistent with some societal norm.And NO, we can’t theologize around explicit Scriptural truth. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Jason Loller says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA September 3, 2013 at 4:27 pm I see lots of talk about “being Christian” and the like … yet I also see anger and vile in some of the posts …. I urge everyone to re-read their thoughts and opinions …… and to act as Christians …. not just in name only but in love and charity with everyone, even those who differ in opinion from each of us ….. Just my thoughts ….. there is a lot of negative out in the world already, we should make every attempt to put that away and to focus on what Christ taught us …… Thanks,Mike September 9, 2013 at 9:24 am Eric,Unfortunately we will not be judged on playing by the rules of TEC or Gen Con. We will be judged according to our lives lived in accord with the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testament. Be very careful in determining whose rules you choose to play by, the result does have eternal consequences.Well said Doug. Rector Albany, NY September 1, 2013 at 5:50 am THE Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth is not rejoicing. W T Wheeler says: August 31, 2013 at 10:31 am For Grant and others with his opinion….you have a right to disagree with the Episcopal church. No Episcopalian will dispute that. Anyone who disagrees can change church’s and go elsewhere. My church building was taken from me and I could do nothing about it. Your opinion seems to be that was ok. At the time it was unbelievable and hurtful. Our priest had no care or concern for Episcopalians. He could no longer bring himself to pastor us. We asked for space to meet and were told no. We asked for prayer books and were told no. We asked for a frank discussion about the issues and were told no. We asked to have a parish vote and were told no. What was Christian about that? As it turns out, we were blessed. We meet in a theatre every Sunday morning with an average attendance of 92. We give 10% of our budget to mission but the reality has been more like 22%. We are able to do this because we have no building or grounds to maintain. We have grown every year since the split. God has shown us we don’t need a building to his work. Christians often disagree. No one wanted a lawsuit. There was another way to do this. Those who disagreed could have moved on but they did not. Or, what about the possibly diving the assets so each group had buildings for worship? The decision on how to worship has been made by both sides already. So, isn’t it better to let the court decide the rest? September 11, 2013 at 1:20 pm George, where is your proof? Let’s see some numbers to this claim. In fact the opposite is true. ACNA continues to grow and flourish. How is TEC doing? Where are all of these people TEC promised would come rushing through the doors once same- sex marriage was sanctioned? Rector Tampa, FL Ron Caldwell says: September 3, 2013 at 4:49 pm The simple majority of the TSC justices (five of nine) determined that the ruling by the district court had somehow relegated Texas law (statutes on non-profit corporations) inferior to the First Amendment of the United States Constitution (regarding freedom of religion), although no such statement was made in the lower court decision, and that this qualified the case to come under the jurisdiction of the TSC.I am neither a lawyer nor very astute, but isn’t the converse of what the TSC is saying is that Texas law (statutes on non-profit corporations) is superior (takes precedent) over considerations of the U.S. Constitution and First Amendment? And (I guess) if the US Supreme Court doesn’t agree, the TSC would just take the lead of our erstwhile governor and secede from the United States. Doesn’t this just make me proud?In what was to me a very confusing statement, the majority stated: (referring to the Diocese of Northwest Texas case, known as the Masterson case) “We also concluded that even both the deference and the neutral principles methodologies are constitutionally permissible, Texas courts should use only the neutral principles methodology in deciding this type of controversy.” (My comment: So why are they both permissible?).Finally, I was also surprised that after all of the filings and paperwork, after the oral arguments, and after the over ten months of deliberations, the TSC decision written by Justice Johnson (or was that Johnsons?) could not decide the name of our bishop. On page 4 of the decision, he is referred to as Bishop Ohls two different times, but on page 11 he is referred to as Bishop Ohls once and Bishop Ohl twice. His name is the Rt. Rev. C. Wallis Ohl. Rector Smithfield, NC Property Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA David Yarbrough says: George Elliot says: August 30, 2013 at 11:56 pm RE: “Episcopalians disappointed by Texas Supreme Court opinion”Certainly *some* Episcopalians are disappointed. But many others — me included — are thrilled. Many of us are rejoicing with The Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth. September 4, 2013 at 8:58 pm @Jim: Apropos Sarah, the first amendment and Supreme Court precedent is clear: Hierarchical churches may determine who is a member, and who is not, without review from the courts. Thus, if Sarah’s only membership is in an organization not affiliated with The Episcopal Church, she is not an Episopalian, regardless of the outcome of the property litigation. No other outcome is possible under our legal system. And this is the case, regardless of what one believes about the ordination of women, or marriage equality. Or, in other words, the property litigation will not, regardless of outcome, result in the former Episcopal Diocese again becoming an Episcopal diocese by virtue of any action on the part of the courts. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ron Caldwell says: Rector Knoxville, TN Caron Hazel says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL September 1, 2013 at 11:46 am You must be a pretty old guy to have worshiped in that church 1877?If to remain Episcopalians you had to continue the same practices and policies, the same discipline, that was that of the Episcopal Church in 1877, you would have to reject the 1979 PB and the 1928 PB and use the 1892 PB revision that was in use then. You would have to excommunicate anyone who divorced and remarried while the former spouse still lived and you could use only the King James Version, the Coverdale Psalms or the authorized metrical Psalter. Milton Finch says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Eric Bonetti says: Ron Caldwell says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA September 9, 2013 at 9:18 am Eric,Sarah is a member of an Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Upper South Carolina. She has not left TEC, and continues to fight for and promote the orthodox faith which abhors the direction that 815 and Gen Con continues to foist on the Church. Before you presume to lecture Sarah about these matters, please find out if she is still within TEC or not. She very much has a right to her voice in the matter as she has not left. Unless, of course, what most of us believe to be true that the “big tent” of TEC has only enough room for those who agree with where it has gone and where it is going. Conservatives within TEC were once tolerated, now they are scorned.last_img read more

first_img Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Fort Worth update Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Tags Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Restructuration du diocèse de Fort Worth : une « résurrection » Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Episcopal News Service – Fort Worth (Texas)] Aux épiscopaliens qui considèrent « l’église » comme un lieu où l’on va plutôt que ce que l’on est, le Diocèse de Fort Worth a de quoi raconter.Son histoire va bien au-delà de la restructuration – voire même de la réanimation – d’une structure diocésaine et congrégationnelle après le vote en novembre 2008 par une majorité d’anciens membres du clergé et leaders laïcs de quitter l’Église épiscopale. C’est une histoire de résurrection – celle d’épiscopaliens réinventant leur église et, ce faisant, eux-mêmes.« Nous n’essayons pas de reconstruire une vieille église », déclare J. Scott Mayer, l’évêque provisoire de Fort Worth, qui est également l’évêque du Diocèse du Nord-Ouest du Texas. « Nous essayons de prendre part à la résurrection pour devenir un nouveau corps ».Ces épiscopaliens ont établi de nouveaux ministères et, ce faisant, développent de nouvelles manières d’être une église dans leur façon de servir leurs communautés.Et lorsqu’ils « vont à l’église », certains épiscopaliens de Fort Worth se réunissent dans des espaces atypiques comme un théâtre ou un centre commercial. Les Wise County Episcopalians (épiscopaliens du comté de Wise) ont par exemple leur lieu de culte dans un bâtiment qui était à l’origine celui de l’Episcopal Mission of the Ascension (mission épiscopale de l’Ascension) en 1889, puis est ensuite devenu une fabrique de matelas et, plus récemment, une chapelle pour les mariages.Même le poste d’évêque est différent. Bien que la formule d’évêque provisoire soit utilisée ailleurs dans l’église épiscopale, c’est tout de même quelque chose de relativement rare qui, selon Scott Mayer, illustre la façon dont les diocèses pourraient mettre en commun leurs ressources.Il fait remarquer que l’évêque Sean Rowe du diocèse du Nord-Ouest de la Pennsylvanie (qui est également évêque provisoire du Diocèse de Bethlehem dans la partie Est de l’État), souligne que dans les années 1960 l’Église épiscopale avait un moindre nombre de diocèses mais que maintenant elle a un plus grand nombre de diocèses et un moindre nombre de fidèles.« Il se pourrait bien que ce ne soit pas un modèle durable pour nous tous », poursuit Scott Mayer, ajoutant qu’il ne préconise pas nécessairement d’associer des diocèses mais que l’Église va probablement devoir trouver de nouveaux moyens de partager les ressources diocésaines.« Et, dans ce cas, la ressource à partager ce serait l’évêque », conclut-il.Scott Mayer est le quatrième évêque provisoire de Fort Worth. Le premier était Edwin F. « Ted » Gulick Jr., alors évêque du Kentucky, suivi de C. Wallis Ohl Jr. évêque retraité du Nord-Ouest du Texas puis de Rayford B. High Jr., évêque suffragant retraité.Forth Worth compte dix-sept congrégations dont une congrégation luthérienne ayant comme pasteur un prêtre épiscopalien. Depuis la scission, le diocèse a connu une augmentation de 19,3 % de ses membres pratiquants et une augmentation de 11,9 % de son revenu d’exploitation. Depuis sa restructuration en 2009, Fort Worth a chaque année versé l’intégralité du montant demandé par l’Église épiscopale pour soutenir le budget triennal de toute l’église. Il est le seul des six diocèses de l’État du Texas à l’avoir fait.Katie Sherrod, directrice des communications à Forth Worth a déclaré à Episcopal News Service qu’au sortir de la restructuration de 2009, toute l’administration était totalement désorganisée car l’ancien évêque occupait les bureaux diocésains et d’autres biens appartenant à l’Église épiscopale. « Nous avons passé 2009 et 2010 à localiser les épiscopaliens, reconstruire les congrégations, trouver le clergé et localiser des lieux de culte. En 2011/2012, nous avons finalement eu une évaluation réaliste du nombre de membres dans les congrégations du diocèse », explique-t-elle. « C’est sur la base de ces chiffres qu’est faite l’évaluation de notre croissance ».Transformer la manière dont l’Église épiscopale gère les vingt-quatre comtés du Centre-Nord du Texas vient en partie de la nécessité en tant qu’Église épiscopale et que diocèse de chercher à récupérer les biens immeubles et autres actifs encore contrôlés par ceux qui ont quitté l’église. La Cour d’appel du Texas étudie l’affaire après avoir entendu les plaidoiries orales, lors de l’audience du 19 avril 2016.« On prévoit, cependant, que la décision de la Cour d’appel soit portée en appel devant la Cour suprême du Texas par la partie à l’encontre de qui la Cour d’appel aura tranché », explique Katie Sherrod.L’Église épiscopale dans son ensemble a soutenu la réinvention du diocèse. Le Conseil exécutif, qui s’est réuni dans le diocèse deux fois depuis la scission, a en juin offert une aide sous la double forme d’une subvention directe prise sur le budget global de l’église – de l’argent recueilli par le Bureau du développement de l’Église et l’Évêque Primat – et de subventions pour l’implantation d’églises et le développement de missions locales par le biais de la résolution 2015-D005 du processus d’implantation d’églises.Le financement, assuré conjointement par le diocèse et ses congrégations, aide à soutenir le clergé en charge des communautés de foi à croissance rapide.Le projet « 4 Saints Food Pantry » (aide alimentaire des quatre saints) qui vise à répondre aux besoins et établir des relations avec des personnes qui souffrent de la faim dans le désert alimentaire de la partie Est de Fort Worth, a reçu une subvention de 20 000 dollars au titre de la « Mission Enterprise Zone ». Le ministère emploiera l’argent pour commencer à acheter de l’équipement nécessaire pour une banque alimentaire homologuée. La banque alimentaire aura ses activités à St. Luke’s in the Meadow Episcopal Church (Fort Worth). Ultérieurement, elle établira un partenariat officiel avec la Tarrant Area Food Bank. St. Luke, St. Martin (Keller-Southlake), St. Stephen (Hurst) et St. Alban (culte au Théâtre Arlington) sont les quatre « saints » associés à ce ministère.En vue d’obtenir des fonds supplémentaires liés à la résolution D005, d’autres demandes de subventions sont en cours, dont une pour l’implantation dune église dans la partie Ouest de Fort Worth à croissance rapide, ajoute Katie Sherrod. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 de Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 3, 2017 last_img read more

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Youth & Young Adults Produced by Miranda Shafer Posted Jul 11, 2017 Episcopal Youth Event, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI EYE17, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release EYE17 Podcast, Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PAcenter_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Podcast: EYE17 kicks off in Oklahoma Coverage of Day 1 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preached and presided during the opening Eucharist of EYE17. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service — Edmond, Oklahoma] The Episcopal Youth Event is underway in Edmond, Oklahoma, from July 10-14. Ninety of 109 Episcopal dioceses are represented and more than 1,400 people — including chaperones, volunteers, chaplains, medical workers — are on the ground here at the University of Central Oklahoma. Episcopal News Service sent Miranda Shafer to Oklahoma to cover the event. Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Jan 4, 2018 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Church of England unveils £24.4 million ($33 million) national investment in new churches and evangelism Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of England has announced grants of £24.4 million ($33 million) in the latest [portion] of its Renewal and Reform program funding. The money is being provided by the Church’s strategic investment board, which was created as part of a change in the way national funding from the church commissioners is provided to diocese and parishes. Previously, the commissioners provided support to dioceses on the basis of a national formula. But after a review looking into resourcing the future of the Church, the Archbishops’ Council and the House of Bishops agreed instead that all of the national funding should be distributed for investment in the spiritual and numerical growth of the Church.Read the entire article here. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Evangelism Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion, Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

first_imgUganda’s president pledges to rebuild Anglican Martyrs shrine in Namugongo Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Africa, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service [Anglican Communion News Service] President of Uganda Yoweri Museveni, has pledged government funds to help re-build the Anglican Martyrs Shrine at Namugongo. His comments were made as a reported four million pilgrims descended on the area June 3 for Martyrs Day services. Reports indicate that an estimated 700,000 of them were at the service at the Anglican shrine. The museum at the Anglican site re-opened after refurbishment ahead of a visit by Pope Francis in 2015. There are now plans to improve the shrine itself.Read the full article here. Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Posted Jun 4, 2018 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [13 de junio de 2018] El Obispo Presidente Michael Curry, ofreció el siguiente comunicado:Jesús dijo: “Les doy este mandamiento nuevo: Que se amen los unos a los otros. Así como yo los amo a ustedes, así deben amarse ustedes los unos a los otros. Si se aman los unos a los otros, todo el mundo se dará cuenta de que son discípulos míos”. (Juan 13:34-35)En mis años de ministerio, he visto y sido bendecido personalmente por innumerables hermanas y hermanos LGBTQ. Queridos amigos y amigas, la iglesia ha sido bendecida de la misma manera por ustedes. Conjunto a muchos más, ustedes son fieles seguidores de Jesús de Nazaret y de su camino de amor. Ustedes han ayudado a la iglesia a ser verdaderamente católica, universal, una casa de oración para todas las personas. Ustedes han ayudado a la iglesia a ser un verdadero reflejo de la amada comunidad de Dios. Ustedes han ayudado a la iglesia a auténticamente ser una rama del movimiento de Jesús en nuestro tiempo.Sus ministerios para con esta iglesia son innumerables. Yo podría hablar de cómo a menudo ustedes lideran nuestras juntas parroquiales y otros órganos de liderazgo en la iglesia. Yo podría hablar de cuántos de ustedes organizan nuestras liturgias de adoración, levantan nuestras voces en el canto, gestionan los fondos de la iglesia, enseñan y forman a nuestros hijos como seguidores de Jesús, lideran congregaciones, ministerios y diócesis. Pero a través de todas esas cosas y por encima de todo, ustedes siguen fielmente a Jesús y su camino de amor. Y al hacerlo, ustedes ayudan a la iglesia, no tanto a construir una iglesia más grande solo por el mero hecho de hacerlo, sino que ayudan también a construir un mundo mejor por el amor de Dios.Durante junio, los estadounidenses y las personas de todo el mundo observan el orgullo. Mientras lloramos a las 49 personas que fueron asesinadas en el club nocturno Pulse en Orlando hace tres años, estoy consciente de que el orgullo es a la vez una celebración y un testamento del dolor y la lucha que aún no han terminado. Especialmente este mes, ofrezco un agradecimiento especial a Dios por la fortaleza de la comunidad LGBTQ y por todo lo que comparten con sus cónyuges, sus parejas e hijos, con sus comunidades de fe, de hecho, con toda nuestra nación. Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Comunicado del Obispo Presidente sobre el Mes del Orgullo honra a los episcopales LBGTQ Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Posted Jun 13, 2019 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSAnuviaEdison Awards Previous articleAAA: Gas prices may have peakedNext articleFarmworker Association sending a message on May Day Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Gala Awards Celebrationcenter_img From Sybil Jones of Sybil Jones and CompanyAnuvia Plant Nutrients has received the Bronze Award for Sustainability at the 2017 Edison Awards presentations in New York City. This prestigious award recognizes the world’s best innovations and inventors. Anuvia was honored for its Organic MaTRX™ technology, which turns organic waste into highly efficient plant nutrients.Anuvia won the award in the Sustainability category, which recognizes advancements that transform the world of commerce and foster energy conservation. The Edison Awards are among the most esteemed accolades to honor excellence in new product and service development, marketing, human-centered design, and innovation. Award winners represent “game changing” products and services, as well as excellence and leadership in innovation around four criteria: Concept, Value, Delivery and Impact.Each year, more than 4,000 products compete for the Edison Awards. Each entry is thoroughly reviewed by the innovation leaders that make up the Edison Awards steering committee and then voted on by more than 3,000 professionals from the fields of product development, design, engineering, science, marketing and education including professional organizations representing a wide variety of industries and disciplines.Throughout the entire process, Edison Universe seeks out “innovators who have globally influential ideas, who have exhibited the incredible dedication, effort, and persistence required to bring dreams to life,” notes steering committee member Kenneth D. Gray. “They remind us that what we can dream, we can achieve.”In the case of Anuvia, the innovative technology was developed by examining ways to utilize organic waste—from food, livestock or municipalities. The resulting technology created a plant nutrient that fit the concept of a “circular economy” where organic waste materials are consumed and processed into homogenous multi-nutrient enhanced efficiency, slow-release plant nutrient products which protect the environment and improve soil health and plant growth.“We are honored to be a recipient of the Edison Award. This technology has enormous potential to reduce organic excess and produce commercially viable, environmentally sustainable products,” says Hugh MacGillivray, Anuvia’s executive vice president of commercial.The Organic MaTRX is a novel slow-release delivery system that mimics what happens to organic matter in the soil. It places up to 17% organic matter back into the soil. It does not use any of the current chemical or poly coating technologies used by other slow release products. Anuvia products reduce nutrient losses in the environment and deliver a balanced nutrient package for crops and turf.Anuvia offers two product lines with the Organic MaTRX—GreenTRX™ for golf and turf markets and SymTRX™ for agriculture. Anuvia started its first full-scale production line one year ago in Zellwood, FL. By 2020, it projects that additional facilities will open to serve crop and turf markets throughout the U.S.Kicking off their year as Edison Award honorees, the award recipients gathered in New York City to participate in Edison’s “Meet the Innovators Forum” at the New York Academy of Sciences and an Exhibitor’s Showcase. The day was capped off by a Black-Tie Awards Ceremony where awards were officially presented in recognition of the very best of the best in innovation worldwide.The Edison Awards are named after Thomas Alva Edison, who pioneered new product development methods and a systematic process of innovation. This year marks the 30th year that Edison Universe has presented the Edison Awards. Recipients have ranged from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. The award is considered to be 3rd-party validation that delivers an affirmation of superior quality. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter From Florida Hospital “The added pressure to buy more and spend more grows, and by the time we get to Christmas, we tend to lose focus,” says Stephanie Arguello, MPH, CREATION Health consultant.So, how do you overcome these enormous, constant-purchase pressures?You become a mindful shopper.And Arguello shares her tips on how to master the art of mindful shopping for your whole health this holiday.1. Be present over presents“Getting and giving presents can tend to take over the holiday, instead of putting the focus on simply spending time with family, friends and loved ones,” comments Arguello. She adds that becoming so caught up in purchasing gifts can cause both emotional and financial hardship, which only adds to personal stress and pressure around this time of year.“Taking the priority away from a material item and back on the people in your life helps to shift your mindset back to what’s important over the holidays.” And it will also reduce your purchase pressure to shop until you and your wallet drop.2. Be more awareYou know it’s coming, but somehow, you just never feel quite prepared. Black Friday. Cyber Monday. Midnight Madness. Early-Bird Deals. They. Just. Keep. Coming.So, before the shopping season, take a mindful moment to mentally prepare yourself for what’s ahead, advises Arguello. “It’s hard to ignore it, so just be aware that you are going to see a lot more influence and pressure to shop just about everywhere you go, and on every screen or device in your view.”With this, Arguello says to “control the controllables.” This means unsubscribing to some email lists, or sending them to an unchecked folder for the holiday season to reduce temptation and the heavy pressure to “click.”And it seems obvious, but have a mantra for yourself: “I don’t have to buy something just because it’s on sale.”3. Set boundariesThis takes awareness and preparing to another level. Go into the holiday shopping season with your limits in place. And stick to them.Arguello recommends, “Make a gift budget and list ahead of time that includes all of the gifts that you must purchase and start your shopping a couple of months ahead of the busy shopping season. Get gifts over time that mean something. Don’t wait until last minute when the tension in stores is higher. Setting a budget and limits also reduces the initial financial impact all at once.”You can use this same approach and purchase a few “extra” gifts to have on hand. “I always shop throughout the year, picking up some small gifts when I see them on sale. I keep a drawer of these things handy so if a last-minute dinner invitation or event comes up, I have something ready and don’t have to rush out to the store last minute.”4. Mind your environment“Your environment influences your health and state of mind. So, if the bustling holiday shopping environment stresses you out, consider shopping during off times or online,” suggests Arguello.Waiting to shop a week before Christmas is sure to wreak havoc on your stress levels. Having a shopping plan with exactly what item you are buying for a specific person and at what store will help you stay on track and in control.If you like to shop online, it’s a great way to boost convenience, do your research and price compare. If you want to purchase in-store, starting out online to see what’s available or calling ahead to reserve an item could save a lot of time and keep overspending in check. “Use technology to your advantage,” says Arguello.5. Encourage the gift of healthThis is true for yourself and those for which you are shopping.Arguello comments, “Think about what message is in the gift you are giving. Gifts that encourage healthy behaviors like working out, such as a nice water bottle or exercise clothes, tell someone that you want to help them reach their personal goals; it tells them that you care.”And don’t forget to take care of yourself, too. The holidays naturally bring an element of stress, so rest, get enough sleep, be mindful of enjoying the personal time with friends and family, maintain self-care and incorporate healthy nutrition and exercise into your daily routines.“Don’t put too much responsibility on your plate. Sometimes you can’t go to everything and that’s okay. Give yourself permission to take a break, and have a plan for how you will find balance in your daily nutrition and exercise with the temptations of the holiday overindulgence all around you.” says Arguello.This could be encouraging family members to go for walk after a large meal, or skipping the sweets and gooey cinnamon buns at the food court while shopping. Every healthy choice goes a long way this time of year.6. Get creativeCan your holiday gift list be whittled down? If you have a large family, consider a gift swap or secret Santa exchange so that each family member can focus on buying one thoughtful gift for one person. This helps with everyone’s budget and stress.“Get creative with how your family and friends exchange gifts, and think about how you can make a gift something intangible, like an experience, too,” says Arguello. It’s never too late to redefine what a gift means for yourself and your family.7. Focus on gratitudeLastly, Arguello reminds us to refocus on what the season is all about. Find opportunities to show thanks for what you have in your life, find ways to “gift” your time by giving back to the community and encourage your family and friends to do the same.Helping others is a gift for others and yourself. When you give back, you get back the greatest gift of all: gratitude, hope, and faith in the holiday spirit.Learn more about CREATION Health at Florida Hospital. TAGSFlorida Hospital Previous articleRetail rage: Why Black Friday leads shoppers to behave badlyNext articleStorm debris contractor donates to Loaves and Fishes Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herecenter_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 last_img read more

first_img Please enter your comment! charles towne I remember the first time I met Nancy, I knew right away I should get to know her and so I did! Together we discovered we both loved “old movies”, we decried the fact that men no longer wore hats, real hats like “bogey” wore! We had many fasinating coversations and I miss them because I do not see her as often as I’d like.You know Chuck, my mom had dementia and she lived with my sister. I am well aware that all to often, the disease does more harm to the caregiver than the patient! You made a difficult decision but it was made from love, prayer, and good judgement! I know it was not easy, but it was necessary! God truly loves Nancy because He gave her you to watch over her! Reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Charles Towne is first and foremost a Christian. An octogenarian, author, journalist, wildlife photographer, naturalist, caregiver, and survivor, his life has been and continues to be, a never-ending adventure filled with possibilities never imagined. He has adopted the philosophy that to Live fully, laugh uproariously, love passionately, and learn like there is no tomorrow, is a formula for a long and joy-filled life. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom 21 COMMENTS Mike, God bless you pal. I really appreciate your words my friend. I can’t express what your kind attention means to Nanny and thus vicariously to me. Chaz April 29, 2018 at 8:41 am Reply Don, what you describe is a natural state and it befalls us all but it is not easy to accept the inevitable. What we do have a say in is how we love patiently and care for those around us. There is that time that we all must accept what will be but until that going away moment let it be said of us that we were Christlike in all we did or said. Nobody likes to see a loved one fail but it certainly makes a difference when we have a trust and absolute faith in friend God. Blessings pal, Chaz May 1, 2018 at 4:24 pm Kristin Reply Reply Gymrat Richard Reply michael InspirationBy Charles Towne Upon first meeting Nancy Lou Towne you can’t help but be struck by her beautiful smile and happy attitude.  Well educated and friendly she possesses a keen sense of humor which enables her to make friends easily.  A devoted Christian Nancy was 27 and an honors graduate of the University of Pittsburgh when she went on her third archeological dig to Israel. (She claims she left her heart in that place)It was while she was in the Holy Land that she and a group of university students went to Egypt with the intent of climbing the great pyramid. She was at the summit when she suddenly and quite inexplicably went blind in her left eye.  Her sight gradually returned but when she arrived back in the states she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis which has challenged her for the past forty yearsFlorida Living is a nursing home as well as an assisted living retirement community located in Apopka not far from Orlando. A home away from home for the people that reside there, Florida Living has been that and much more for Nancy for nearly a year nowNancy (I call her Nanny) is my wife as well as the joy of my life.Seventeen years ago she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and since then it has been my joy and sometimes my frustration to be her caregiver and this is where the Florida Living nursing center enters the picture.The unrelenting stress of caregiving invariably takes a deadly toll on everybody involved, the patient, the caregiver and the extended family as well.After three heart attacks, diabetes, and COPD, I saw the handwriting on the wall… I was dying and if that were to happen who would care for my darling Nancy?Reluctantly I began searching for just the right nursing home.Many caregivers delay the inevitable. They, like I did at one time feel that if they place their loved one in a nursing home they are abandoning not only the person but their obligation as the caregiver as well.Yes, I searched… I prayed… oh, how I prayed… and I found the Florida Living Nursing Center.I visit Nanny in Florida Living frequently and I am taking excellent care of myself as well.   By good health practices and a deep faith in Papa God, all of my health issues have been reversed.The Florida Living nursing center is striving to provide a facility where my wife and the other residents can obtain compassionate as well as professional care if and when they need it.Yes, Florida Living is a haven where I trust that Nancy is receiving the care she needs and praise God it has likely saved my life as well.Yes, we called out for help… and naturally, our loving God answered! April 29, 2018 at 2:59 pm charles towne Dear NH, there is an interesting phenomenon at work when otherwise intelligent men and women continue on a course they know is absolutely destructive. I praise God for giving me the incentive and the motivation to make some life changing decisions. We all know people that are grossly overweight but refuse to change their eating habits because the enjoy the food or whatever it is that is making them fat. I was fooling myself with the idea that I was being noble or something by continuing to care for Nanny even when I knew the constant stress was killing me. Sometimes we need to make difficult decisions and if we call on Him Papa God will guide us and strengthen us to His glory. Pray for me and I will continue to pray for you. Your brother in Jesus, Chaz Don Young April 29, 2018 at 1:01 pm Reply Reply Reply April 30, 2018 at 10:05 am TAGSCharles TowneInspiration Previous articleHow live liver transplants could save thousands of livesNext articlePut a little love in your heart Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply May 5, 2018 at 10:18 pm charles towne Reply May 5, 2018 at 6:58 am May 4, 2018 at 12:53 pm Undoubtedly, the most difficult decision you had ever been forced to make. It sounds like you did the research and asked God to do the driving. Well Done, Charles! Self-Care and personal wellness of caregivers is often overlooked. I have been preaching it’s importance for over 2 decades. This is a perfect example…so glad you saw the proverbial writing on the wall before it was too late! Thanks for sharing and enlightening our readers! Kristin, I am lucky, no, I am blessed to have Nancy in my life. I thank God every day for the opportunity to care for her. I am a better man because of her but having said that I recognize my limitations therefore I am thankful for the nursing home which enables me to be there for her in a healthier capacity than would be possible if I was called upon to care for her 24/7 on my own as before. I believe the greatest thing that caregivers can do is care for themselves thus the time spent with their loved one is undivided. Let us be a blessing to all. Chaz charles towne Reply Reply Don, it is caregivers such as yourself that makes me realize that there really are larger than life heroes surrounding us. Betty was so fortunate to have you my friend and she was so thankful that you were always there. God bless you pal, Chaz May 2, 2018 at 9:46 am charles towne LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Dear CSG, yes! Once again you prove my premise is correct, that caregivers are created of extra special stuff. I know that your husband counted himself exceedingly blessed to have you at his side. He loved you mightily. May Papa God bless you and hold you close is my prayer. Chaz Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply charles towne CSG Reply It is an unfortunate fact that we are all too close to being ” classics” ourselves, or if not classics, surely we are at the very least “vintage”!!! April 30, 2018 at 1:09 pm May 1, 2018 at 1:30 pm Reply Kennie NH charles towne Charles Towne It’s good to know that you’ve done your research on a facility thoroughly enough that you only had to place Nancy once. If folks find themselves searching for facilities they can utilize the free resources available through the Alzheimer’a & Dementia Resource Center (www.ADRCcares.org). Even if they don’t place their loved one outside the home ADRC has fabulous classes that can guide you on your caregiving journey. Keep up the good work, Charles! Don Lindsey Kennie, I am struck by the importance of good dedicated people in any organization and especially in the healthcare professions. As we continually strive for perfection we draw ever nearer that allusive dream. Florida Living is NEVER merely four walls and a roof but a reflection of MANAGEMENT, yes, A REFLECTION OF YOU and the rest of the staff continually reaching and working to make a good thing better. Thanks Kennie, keep up the good work, Chaz May 1, 2018 at 1:46 pm May 4, 2018 at 3:01 pm May 4, 2018 at 1:35 pm UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Richard, I don’t know exactly how it relates to the issue at hand but it seems to me that old fossil, neanderthal and ape man seem to resonate with some of us. Not Nancy of coarse ’cause she will always be classic, and perhaps not me but the rest of us perhaps, maybe. Chaz charles towne April 30, 2018 at 7:58 pm Charles Towne April 30, 2018 at 7:52 pm Dear Gymrat, good info and thanks a lot. Yes, I placed Nanny once but checked out half a dozen nursing homes before I settled on Florida Living. At that I was very blessed. Some have to wait for months, even years to find placement in the nursing home of their choice. Yes, I was blessed beyond belief. No facility is 100% perfect but I know that my wife is safe. Oh sure there are issues. This evening I went in and discovered that my darling had thrown some of her clothes away because they needed to be washed. Frustrating yes, can we handle it? Yes, a thousand times yes because I love my darling and after all, it wasn’t the homes fault. Thanks again, Chaz Reply What a wonderful article, I have the pleasure of know both Charles and Nancy. It is a great joy to hear their story . Michael April 29, 2018 at 9:06 am May 1, 2018 at 1:55 pm Richard, what can I say other than thank you from the depths of my heart. I like the classic hats as well as the classic movies and especially my Nancy because she is a genuine classic. Many blessings on you and everything you touch my friend. Chaz I also was looking for a place that could take care of my wife Betty. She hit a truck head on, fifty years ago, and I had been taking care of her for 21 years. This had been 24 hours a day and I was reaching a point where I could no longer keep up with Betty’s needs. FLNC (Florida Living Nursing Center) was the answer I had been looking for, and in 2016 she was accepted as a Full Time Care resident. Originally given 3 days to live, by all her doctors, God answered all the prayers by extending her life. Last month, 3 days before her 91st Birthday, Betty had an incident she couldn’t overcome. Hospice of the Comforter stepped in, and Betty was given the best (EOL) end of life care possible! I would also like to add, that when I was called at 1:00am, and told that Betty would not last the night, my best friend Charles Towne came in and sat with me. At the last, I wasn’t alone….Thanks Chuck! Reply Reply Beautiful article Chuck. My prayers are with you and yours as always. As my parents age, I find myself not wanting to let go of being their caretaker but worry that there may come a time when I have no choice. Your column reminded me to put it in God’s hands. If I do that, He will take care of all involved. God bless!-Donnie Dear friends, thanks so very much for your well thought out comments. It is as much your your comments as the article itself that draws readers and I can’t express my appreciation enough. God bless each of you in a very special way. Chaz Charles, you give such a lovely description of Nancy. She is lucky to have had you to take such good care of her for all of those years. It is good thing that you eventually realized you couldn’t do it all by yourself and reached out to God for a new direction – for the both of you. And He answered. And now you can still watch over her at the Florida Living Nursing Center, while also taking care of yourself. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here May 4, 2018 at 6:45 pm April 30, 2018 at 6:59 am charles towne Reply Oh Chuck, how this article truly hits home with me!! At 80yrs old, my dear sweet mother was caregiver to my brother while he battled throat cancer. It definitely took its toll on her health. Then a few months after he went to be with the Lord, she started all over again with my dad, suffering COPD, until his passing, one year after my brother. She was 85 and worn out, but never stopped giving. My husband and I were able to help, since they each one moved in with us to lighten the load. A few months later, she had deteriorated to the point we could no longer give her the care she required and had to put her into a care facility. My husband and I visited her several times a week and made sure she knew she was loved and not abandoned. During all of this, my husband had several health issues of his own and experienced kidney failure. He had to start dialysis and I became his caregiver. We continued visiting my mother and trying to live life to the max, as much as possible. But, dialysis is hard on you and my husband suffered other issues as well. After my mother passed away, my beloved husband went to join them one year later. It is a difficult thing losing your entire family in a 6yr period, but knowing where they are and that you gave your best, is very comforting. To all caregivers. God bless you!! I’m sure God has a very special reward for your selfless giving. Richard Reply Reply May God continue to bless you and Nancy. And thank you for allowing us to be a part of the healing ministry of Christ. Please enter your name here May 5, 2018 at 2:41 pm Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more