first_imgThe country’s latest lotto millionaire almost didn’t get a chance to collect his huge cheque – after he forgot to take his winning ticket to lottery headquarters in Dublin today.Odhran Doherty, 23, became a millionaire on Saturday night last after dad Liam gave him what proved to be a winning lotto ticket.The young farmer, from The Glebe in Letterkenny, couldn’t believe his luck as he drove by chauffeur-driven limousine to Dublin today. But Odhran revealed how he was forced to tell the driver to turn back after he forgot to take his winning ticket with him.He said “I almost wasn’t collecting the money at all. We were up the road and heading towards Lifford when I realised I didn’t have the ticket.“I had to ask the driver to do a quick turnaround and head back to the house where I had the ticket hidden away.“Can you imagine if I had landed all the way to Dublin and they had asked for the ticket and I didn’t have it. How embarrassing would that have been?” And in a bizarre twist of luck, dad Liam has revealed how he is related to another lucky Donegal lotto winner who picked up his cheque just a few weeks ago.Pensioner Charlie Meehan, 84 was the toast of Donegal in February when he scooped €500,000 in the Euromillions draw.Bizarrely, both Liam and Odhran are working on a shed at Charlie’s house.Att he time Charlie said he had already won the lotto even before his numbers came up after he overcame cancer.Liam revealed “I am related to Charlie on my mother’s side and I was so delighted when I heard he had won the lotto. It couldn’t happen to a nicer man. Charlie is an absolute gentleman. “Little did I think that we would be collecting one million euro ourselves just a few weeks later.”Lotto millionaire Odhran forgets his winning ticket on way to collect cheque! was last modified: April 3rd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Chequedonegalletterkennylottowinnerlast_img read more

first_imgCaltech may be the egghead capital of America.  The prestigious university where Einstein and Feynman hung out may be weak in sports and arts, but is unsurpassed in science and engineering.  Caltech graduates are so adept with mathematics and advanced physics, many of them would probably have a hard time at parties telling their relatives and friends what they do for a living.  To avoid making others think they live on an alien planet, ABC/NPR journalist Robert Krulwich has an idea: tell stories.    Krulwich gave the commencement address this past June.  His remarks were just printed in the fall issue of Caltech’s quarterly magazine Engineering and Science (E&S).  The opening caption reads, “Stories matter, and in a nation where belief in alien abductions is on the rise while belief in evolution is on the decline, the best way to defend science is to tell your friends a good story.”  Newton, he explained, was private and secretive to a fault, whereas Galileo knew how to serve up an engaging tale.  Stories are a must when communicating science to party-goers and reporters (though those two groups are not mutually exclusive).    More importantly, he said, the Caltech graduates are not going to be able to win against pseudoscience unless they can outdo it in storytelling.  What pseudoscientists did Krulwich have in mind? Scientists need to tell stories to nonscientists, because science stories—and you know this—have to compete with other stories about how the universe works, and how it came to be.  And some of those other stories—Bible stories, movie stories, myths—can be very beautiful and very compelling.  But to protect science and scientists—and this is not a gentle competition—you’ve got to get in there and tell your version of how things are, and why things came to be.    We all know about creation-science movements in America.  But what you may not know is that such movements are spreading all over the world.From there he launched into details of Adnan Oktar’s lavishly-illustrated Atlas of Creation that has been sent free to schools across Turkey and Europe.  “It’s written in clear and simple language, using fabulous pictures, and the pictures are designed to ‘prove’ that fossils show no evidence of evolution.”  This is definitely bad, Krulwich argued, using Oktar, a Muslim, as his prototypical creationist.    Krulwich appealed to Galileo’s Dialogues Concerning the Two World Systems as an example of effective storytelling.  Then he used some dialogue between nitwits on Friends to illustrate the scientific illiteracy of the general public.  Metaphor to the rescue: “Stories with gripping visuals and good punch lines, stories that make intuitive sense, that make sensual sense—to your eyes, to your ears, to your touch—can convince,” he preached.  “They have power.”    For recent examples befitting modern science’s penchant for abstruse disconnection from reality, he pointed to the well-known Schrödinger’s Cat illustration, and to how a visitor to the Grand Canyon might bring its vastness down to earth with a line from Loren Eiseley, “the magnificent violence hidden in a raindrop.”     Krulwich saved his best example for last.  He referred to Mary Schweitzer’s research on medullary bone in dinosaurs, and how it compared with ostrich bone (see 06/03/2005).  It could be dull scientific stuff until it is dressed in the storyteller’s art:So Mary and her two assistants collected the dead ostrich, which was in the farmer’s backhoe bucket, and drove it back to Raleigh, and what do you know?  The former ostrich had been a pregnant former ostrich, and the bones looked pretty similar.  The next year, Mary published a paper in Science with the dinosaur bone right next to an emu bone, which looks even more like Bob’s. And since then, another T. rex, this one in Argentina, was found to have the same calcium structure—more evidence that when you look deep inside dinosaurs and deep inside birds, what you see is very, very similar.  Which gives us yet another reason to think that the robin in your front yard is an itty, bitty dinosaur.    If your nonscience friend listens to that story, and leans in a little, and hears how scientists work with bones and dead birds in buckets, patiently looking for patterns, you have just placed a sword in her hand.  The next time somebody tells her that scientists are know-it-alls who toss off opinions, that science is an elitist plot, she would think, “welllll, but I did hear this story . . .” and the scientific method gets a little more defense, a little protection.    But better than that, the next time your friend sees a robin, she’ll see, I hope, more than a robin.  She’ll glance at a little bird pecking for worms on the lawn, and she’ll travel 70 million years back to a time and a place that creationists say did not exist, but now, because of your story, your friend has a pregnant tyrannosaurus in her head with the unfortunate name of Bob.  Which makes robins and sparrows and chickadees and crows and all birds just a little more amazing, and a little more delightful to look at.  Which means, you win.  The creationists can’t beat delight.  You have smote them with your story.A published address cannot reveal the audience reactions, but the fact Krulwich was invited, and Caltech published the address in its magazine, would seem to indicate the administration at least approved of his case for storytelling.Robert Krulwich does have a point.  There is a place for metaphor and narrative in science.  We use it often in our commentaries (for a recent example, see the last paragraph of the 10/17/2008 entry, below).  Good teachers, preachers and public speakers know the power of metaphor in rhetoric.  Rhetoric was one of the classical and medieval skills taught to all students.  An academic field known as rhetoric of science emerged after Thomas Kuhn’s 1961 thesis, to explore the ways in which rhetoric aids persuasion within paradigms and by challengers; the book Doubts About Darwin was built on Dr. Thomas Woodward’s PhD thesis that explored the interplay of rhetoric around the emerging Intelligent Design Movement.  Rhetoric of science departments even have their own vocabulary, and plenty of examples in the history of science to draw from.  There are cases to be made that some important scientific paradigms were won or lost by the power of rhetoric.    This is all very interesting and fine.  Scientists ignore rhetoric at their peril.  It’s not persuasion that’s the problem; it’s propaganda.  Here is where Krulwich erred.  We often accuse the Darwinists of engaging not just in storytelling per se, but in “just-so storytelling,” which is made-up stuff.  Scientific explanations, even when aimed at Joe Six-Pack or Joe the Plumber, are supposed to be based in evidence and logic.  Often, Darwinists trade in fables concocted to save their paradigm, even when faced with incriminating evidence.    Krulwich committed several propaganda errors in his address.  First, he divided all humanity into two classes (the either-or fallacy): scientists (e.g., those with honesty, brains and integrity, like Caltech graduates) and the rest of humanity, including scientific dunces like Phoebe on Friends, those who believe in alien abductions, Adnan Oktar, creationists and Bible believers.  He followed this with some fear-mongering about how powerful the bogeymen are: “this is not a gentle competition,” he said, giving the students a sword to conquer them.  After having consigned all non-Caltech-scientists to absurdity, it conveniently allowed him to set up a straw man to push over with very few ergs of energy.  He should read the material of the great creation scientists and best of the ID philosophers.  That’s what we do here: we take on the leading Darwinists in their leading publications.  We challenge their Goliaths.  Why does Krulwich associate creationism with the dimwits on a TV sitcom?  Let him sit down with the PhDs (some from Caltech and MIT and Cambridge) who deny Darwin, and learn a little about his own vulnerability.  Then he gave a vastly oversimplified view of science (the old truth-seeker in the white lab coat using “the scientific method,” whatever that is).  Doesn’t he realize that view went out in the 1950s?    Finally, his sample story about robins being itty-bitty dinosaurs, besides being downright silly, sidestepped the major point of Mary Schweitzer’s work: that finding soft tissue and medullary bone in a dinosaur essentially falsifies the belief they are 65 million years old.  He swallowed the Darwine to the dregs without tasting it first or submitting it to qualitative analysis—the very thing a good scientist is supposed to do.  Consider the flaw, also, in his logic that similarities prove ancestry (see circular reasoning).  If you look deep enough into a man’s DNA and a banana’s DNA, you can find all kinds of similarities.  Darwinists pick and choose the kind of similarities they like, which they call “homologous traits” – or make up terms like “convergent evolution” and “analogous traits” to explain the others – whatever it takes to maintain their belief in Darwin’s metaphorical Tree of Life.  It’s rigged to protect their belief system from falsification.    Overall, Krulwich gets the gong for giving advice built on half-truths.  So while we do not challenge him on the usefulness of being able to communicate scientific ideas effectively using narrative, we hope the graduating seniors of Caltech were discerning enough to smell the baloney in the hot dog.    As for Krulwich’s line, “The creationists can’t beat delight,” this has to be one of the biggest lies of the year.  Creationists, like Louis Louis Pasteur stand amazed at the work of the Creator.  You could not find a happier group – just look at the number of praise songs they have about creation.  Compare this with the vitriol of the Darwinist People of Froth (e.g., 09/26/2005, 06/22/2007) and there is no contest.  Then, Krulwich said, “You have smote them with your story.”  In a way, he’s right.  We’re dumbfounded at the thought of a journalist telling scientists to fib, and with bad grammar at that.    For more on the power of metaphors to mislead as well as inform, see “Metaphors Bewitch You” in the 07/04/2003 entry.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting curt hopkins Related Posts Tags:#TWiOT#web center_img Before covering the events that have taken place this week in Egypt, I think it’s important to examine those stories that are in danger of being lost to the public’s consciousness because of the dramatic nature of what’s happening in Tahrir Square. Also, in one case, it’s instructive to talk about one case which came about as a direct result of Egypt. In fact, let’s start there, with Syria. Syria lifts Internet bans. Syria is an enthusiastic banner of social media tools. Facebook and YouTube have been banned in that authoritarian country for four years. But now, that ban has been lifted. This is a result of the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings. Like those countries, Syria has labored under a prolonged tinhorn tyranny; in this case, it has endured two generations of Assad-family rule. Perhaps it’s hoped this relaxation will act as a pressure release. Perhaps it is also hoped that trouble-makers in the Syrian regime will be more easily identified if they are lured out in the virtual open. “It seems like a policy to curry favor with the youth,” Syrian dissident Ammar Abdulhamid told us. The relaxation was accompanied by the announcement of a food subsidy for the needy. Thailand prosecutes another blogger under lèse majesté. The trail for the prosecution of Chiranuch Premchaiporn, the webmaster of the Prachatai website, is ongoing. The charge of lèse majesté is a popular one in Thailand when the government finds anyone it wishes to muzzle. The charge is one of bad mouthing the king and queen, who are very popular in Thailand. It is the Thai equivalent of “insulting the leader” or “insulting religion.” Burma sentences imprisoned blogger to more time. Kaung Myat Hlaing, known by the blogging name of Nat Soe, has been sentenced to an additional ten year sentence on top of the two years he’s already serving. In a secret “trial,” Hlaing was convicted of being part of a poster campaign in support of dissident Aung San Suu Kyi and others. He was deprived of food and water for ten days until he “confessed” to being part of the postering group. China bans “Egypt” as search term. Most of the countries terrified by the people who are rising up in Tunisia and Egypt are Arab ones, like Saudi Arabia. But China is nothing if not forward thinking and accounts of people forcing their governments to account are definitely outre in the Middle Kingdom. So “Egypt” has joined “Tiananmen” and “falun gong” as banned terms on the Chinese Internet. Malaysia announces Internet censorship regime. The Malaysian government is drawing up “guidelines” (read: laws) for online behavior (read: speech). The fact that these rules are in conjunction with the country’s Sedition Act tells you everything you need to know about the motivation behind them. Blogging is popular in Malaysia and several of its more prominent bloggers eventually even ran for office; one of them, Jeff Ooi, becoming a member of the Malaysian parliament, which makes the limitations all the more unfortunate. American university a hot-bed of censorship. No country lives up to its ideals, but when the place where those ideals are most openly trodden on is the country’s university system, you know something’s wrong. The U.S. is big on free speech, enshrining it in the country’s highest law, the Constitution. But over the past decade or more, more and more university systems have outlawed speech that is “offensive.” Offensive speech is the only speech that requires constitutional and legal guarantee of course. The right to say “good morning” or “nice shoes” or “I like sunshine” is not one likely to be abrogated. The University of Massachusetts Amherst has made – I swear I am not making this up – on-campus rallies on “controversial” subjects (vague, much?) subject to a set of regulations that make them difficult if not impossible to stage. That’s right. At this point, it is easier for Egyptians to protest for the end of the Mubarak regime than UM students to protest against the continuation of U.S. presence in Iraq. I would call the administration of the University of Massachusetts a bunch of douchebags but it probably breaks the school’s speech code. This week in Egypt characterized by blogger abductionsSandmonkey abducted, beaten, freed. Well-known Egyptian blogger Sandmonkey was “arrested,” beaten up, then let go. His blog was also hit, “due to problems related to traffic and attacks (many from IPs in Saudi Arabia),” and has been taken offline “temporarily suspended until the problems can be resolved.” That was on the third; a post appeared again on the sixth. Kareem Amer. Kareem was a cause celebre internationally. He served four years in Egyptian prison for criticizing Islam as well as his country’s leadership. Although many Mideast youth defended his right to speak his mind and conscious, he was reviled in the Egyptian press and elsewhere. He was beaten and otherwise ill-treated by his jailers, repeatedly during his time in jail. He went missing around 11:00 p.m. local time on February 6 after leaving Tahrir Square with a friend. Wael Ghonim. The Google middle eastern marketing executive was held blindfolded by Egyptian security forces for 12 days. When he was released, he admitted to being one of the founders of the We are all Khaled Said group, whose Facebook page organized a lot of the protests. His subsequent TV interviews and speeches have rejuvenating a protest movement that showed signs of flagging before Ghonim was released. What do you like about This Week in Online Tyranny? What would you like to see more of? Less of? How can we make it more interesting and more useful to you? Please let us know in the comments.Tahrir photo via Al Jazeera | Assad photo via Wikimedia Commons | Burmese protest photo by Alan Chan | UMass photo via Wikimedia Commons | Kareem photo via Cyberdissidents.org Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

first_imgHow much power do you need on set? Find out how to calculate it so you never run out.If you’re like me when heading to set, you’ll throw pretty much every battery you have in your camera case. But how much are you going to need, and wouldn’t it be great to know how much your camera consumes before you start?Knowing how much power your camera (and all its accessories) consume is as important as knowing how much it weighs. It would be crazy to put your rig on a crane or a gimbal without knowing if you’ll overload it. By the same token, it’s a little crazy to arrive on set hoping that you have enough power instead of simply knowing that you do.CalculateSo, how do you go about doing this? You add up the power consumption of all the devices you’ll use and work out how much power you’ll need. If you’re running the whole system from one power source, like the V-Mount battery system that I use, it’s a simple issue. You could do all this with individual batteries and devices, as well.Cine batteries are rated in watt hours. A 98 watt hour battery will run a 98 W device for one hour. If you’re curious about why it’s 98 and not 100, it’s because the American FAA states that you can only pack batteries of less than 100 watt hours in luggage, so most manufacturers makes them a little less than that for easier travel.Let’s start with the camera body: go to the specs page of the camera, and look at its power page. (I use B&H because they do a good job of finding and posting specs on their product pages.) For the Canon C200, I had to find it on the Canon Europe website. You can just google power consumption and the name of your device.Image via Canon.I see that the C200 is 18w in 4K Raw mode. This doesn’t tell me if it’s recording or standing by, but it’s safe to guess this is the maximum draw. Below, it tells me that the BP30 battery that comes with the camera, which is a 31 watt hour battery, will run the camera for approximately 130 minutes, or just over two hours. So, 31 divided by 18 is 1.7, making that a 130-minute estimate — probably assuming that you’re not going to be recording with the camera the whole time.So, if I power the camera with the 150 WH battery, I’m going to be able to record for eight hours, but that’s before we’ve added any other accessories.Next, we’ll add the TVLogic F7h, which has a power draw of 19 watts. Yes, that’s more than the camera and probably has an at-max brightness of 3600 nits (which I only use in bright sun outside). But, if we calculate the max draw of all these devices, we’ll have a margin of safety.Image via TVLogic.Next, the Teradek bolt with a much more modest 7 watts. If I added a second monitor, or a wireless follow focus motor, I’d add that in as well.Adding 18, 19, and 7 gives us 44, so I’m going to need 44 Watt hours to run the camera for a single hour. Again, that’s at full capacity so you’ll get more run time than this, but it gives you a margin of safety.For a 10 hour shoot, I’m going to need 440 watt hours. I add up the capacity of my batteries and know if I have enough to get through the day.If I’m shooting with two cameras, I’m going to need twice that, and so on. If I have four cameras, and lights that take 100 watts, you can quickly see how you get to a 100 battery set up.Cover image via Janaka Dharmasena.Looking for more filmmaking tips and tricks? Check out these articles.Set Tone and Atmosphere by Mastering the Establishing ShotFirst-Time Filmmakers: How Do You Build a Cast Without a Budget?The Four Most Dangerous and Avoidable Accidents on a Film SetOn the Market: Five Great Key Lights for Five Different Budgets10k Vs 100k Vs 500k: Feature Film Budgets Comparedlast_img read more

first_imgAiress Padda, Adamson’s eloquent, photogenic American coach, knows things are only going to get tougher in the days to come.“We are slowly getting the consistency that we’ve been working for,” said Padda of the Lady Falcons after mangling the Technological Institute of the Philippines Lady Engineers, 25-12, 25-14, 25-13, Saturday in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo LATEST STORIES It was a far different Adamson that showed up Saturday afternoon at FilOil Flying V Center.The Lady Falcons were a picture of confidence and efficiency, with Jem Galanza leading the way with 18 points.Meanwhile, Ateneo sprung back from a previous defeat with a dominating 25-23, 25-20, 25-20 triumph over Lyceum for a 2-1 slate.The Lady Pirates fell to a 1-2 record.ADVERTISEMENT NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ A time for change Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Gamescenter_img Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim MOST READ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ The win was third straight for Adamson, which is trying to rebuild itself from a disastrous campaign last year in the UAAP.It also moved the Lady Falcons two wins closer to an outright semifinals stint.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingBut Padda knows better than to celebrate this early.“We need to play even better because the competition is going to get tougher for us,” said Padda, who joined Adamson in the previous UAAP season, where the Lady Falcons scored only one win. Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims View comments Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

first_imgIndia’s Yogeshwar Dutt defeated Masoud Esmaeilpoorjouybari of Iran in the repechage round 2 of the 60kg wrestling competition of the London Olympics on Saturday. With this win Yogeshwar is just a win away from bronze medal. This was his fourth bout of the day in which he won three and lost one. First, he beat Bulgaria’s Anatolie llarionovitch Guidea in the qualification, but ended up losing to Russia’s Besik Kudukhov in the pre-quarterfinals. Later in the repechage round one Yogeshwar defeated Puerto Rico’s Franklin Gomez Matos. However, Dutt’s Olympic medal hopes were rekindled as he qualified for the repechage round of the men’s 60kg wrestling event after Russian Besik Kudukhov, who had defeated the Indian in the pre-quarterfinal.Yogeshwar must thank World Champion Kudukhov for keeping alive his bronze medal hope.The Russian, bronze medallist at the 2008 Beijing Games, won his quarter-final match 3-1 against Esmaeilpoorjouybari and semi-final 3-0 against Myong Ri to qualify for the final. Kudukhov will face Azerbaijan’s Toghrul Asgarov in the title clash.Yogeshwar had lost his pre-quarterfinal bout to Kudukhov. The Indian survived just two periods before losing 3-0 to the reigning World Champion, who was also a bronze medallist at the 2008 Beijing Games.last_img read more

first_imgIt comes as no surprise to anyone now that Virat Kohli once again dominated a year in international cricket as a batsman, but it was his record as captain in Test cricket which improved a lot this year thanks to the Indian team’s wins away from home.Kohli ended the year as the number-one ranked batsman in Tests and one-day internationals for the second-time running but more importantly, it was his team which consolidated its position at the top of the team rankings in Test cricket, which would have been more satisfying for the captain.Kohli scored 2735 runs across all formats in the year with 11 hundreds but he also became the first Asian captain to register Test wins in Australia, England and South Africa in the same calendar year.The Boxing Day Test win at the MCG gave Virat Kohli his 11th away Test win as captain in just 24 Tests and he went equal with Ganguly on the record, who had achieved 11 away Test wins in 28 Tests as captain.Kohli had said that this year would be an extremely important one for Team India given the Tests away from home. While India put up some good performances (especially Kohli and the pacers), they failed to win series in South Africa and England.However, in Australia, Kohli’s India came out all guns blazing to at least get them into a position from where they cannot lose the series now.A YEAR OF DOMINATION IN TEST CRICKETOn top of that, Kohli became the first Indian captain to retain the Border-Gavaskar trophy in Australia. India had defeated Australia 2-1 in the four-Test series during their tour of India in 2016/17.advertisementKohli has over the years grown in stature and is rated among the best athletes in the world in terms of his work ethics, fitness and heroics on the field — all-in-all, he has become a complete package. He has been India’s poster boy ever since the retirement of the great Sachin Tendulkar in November 2013. Virat Kohli scored a brilliant 123 in the Perth Test but it went in vain as India lost the match (AP Photo)In just his third year as captain, Kohli has set the benchmark for his teammates to follow by leading from the front. Though it’s tough to maintain the intensity but the Indian skipper has proved that it’s not impossible.With 1322 runs in 13 Tests at an average of over 55, Kohli sits head and shoulders above the rest as the highest run-scorer this year in the format. The five hundreds that he scored is also the most by any batsman in 2018. Last year he was fourth on the list behind Steve Smith, Cheteshwar Pujara and Dean Elgar.But the Delhi dasher really came into his own in what can be termed as a breakthrough year for Kohli, the batsman, in Test cricket as he scored runs in places like Australia, South Africa and England.England was in fact the only country which he hadn’t conquered after a torrid tour in 2014. But Kohli made sure to put the ghosts of his past behind him to amass 593 runs in five Tests at 59.30 with two hundreds to his name.Even the critics who questioned Kohli once, stood up and applauded as he let his bat do all the talking and made sure everybody got the message. The tour of England put the full-stop on the debate on who is the best batsman in the world in the modern era. Virat Kohli scored a magnificent hundred in Trent Bridge to lead India to victory (Reuters Photo)His 25th hundred during the Perth Test was not only one of the best he has ever scored but also saw him become the second fastest batsmen to reach the milestone in 127 innings, just behind the great Don Bradman, who took a mere 68 innings to score 25 Test hundreds.It was Kohli’s seventh Test hundred vs Australia while his 6th Down Under. In Oceania, Kohli has now scored 7 hundreds while this was his 14th ton as captain in away Tests. This was also Kohli’s 18th Test century as the captain of the team.With his sixth Test century in Australia, Kohli also equalled Sachin Tendulkar’s record of most Test centuries by an Indian Down Under.Earlier on the tour at Adelaide Oval, Kohli became the fastest to score 1000 Test runs for India in Australia. He beat Don Bradman to the milestone by reaching the figure in nine Test matches while Don Bradman had reached the four-figure mark in his 10th Test at home.advertisementOn the way to this milestone, Kohli also became the only Indian skipper to score 2000 Test runs in away matches. He is also the first Indian captain to score 2000 Test runs both in India and overseas.Kohli also has the second-best Test average among batsmen who have scored at least 500 Test runs in January 1, 2017.FASTEST TO 10,000 ODI RUNSBut not just in whites, Kohli also dominated the run charts in ODIs, scoring 1202 runs in 14 ODIs at a staggering average of over 133 and once again he scored the most number of centuries with 6. The next best on the list is his teammate and vice-captain Rohit Sharma with 1030 runs in 19 matches with five centuries.During the recent ODI series at home against the West Indies, became only the fourth batsman to score 10,000 ODI runs for India and in the process, he also broke Sachin Tendulkar’s record to become the fastest to reach the milestone. Virat Kohli became the fifth Indian batsman and 13th ever to reach 10000 ODI runs (AP Photo)Kohli joined Tendulkar (18426), Sourav Ganguly (11221) and Rahul Dravid (10768) to reach the elite club. MS Dhoni has also scored over 10000 ODI runs (10123) but only 9949 of those have been scored for India. The other 174 runs came for Asia XI.Overall, Kohli became the fifth Indian batsman and 13th ever to reach 10000 ODI runs. While Tendulkar took 259 innings to get there, Kohli got to the landmark in a mere 205 innings.Ganguly needed 263 innings to reach 10000 ODI runs while South African great Jacques Kallis brought up his 10000th run in his 272nd innings. MS Dhoni is next on the list, having got to the landmark in his 273rd innings.Kohli also scored more than 1000 runs in a calender for the sixth time in his career in 2018 after 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2017.Kohli is second only to Tendulkar in the list of most century-scorers in one-day internationals and it is widely believed he will one day leave the Master Blaster behind.WHAT NEXT?The first and foremost agenda on his list would be to win the fourth and final Test against Australia in Sydney. If he manages to do that then he will become the first Indian captain to win a Test series Down Under.Another Test win would also see him equal MS Dhoni as the most successful Indian captain in the format. Kohli currently has 26 Test wins in just 45 matches while Dhoni had 27 in 60 Tests.India will then play a series of three ODIs against the Aussies which will be followed by a five-match ODI contest against New Zealand from January 23, before the T20I series against the Blackcaps – on February 6, 8 and 10.But the biggest assignment for captain Kohli will be the upcoming 2019 World Cup in England where he will look to become the third Indian skipper to win the 50-over mega-event after Kapil Dev (1983) and MS Dhoni (2011).A Test series win in Australia and a World Cup triumph after eight years would really cement Kohli’s legacy as one of the greatest captains India has ever had.advertisementAlso Read | The Pant and Paine show at MCG: When light-hearted banter turned offensiveAlso Read | Watch: Virat Kohli shakes a leg to celebrate Boxing Day Test win with Bharat ArmyAlso Read | Kohli reveals why he did not enforce follow-on: Wanted to give our bowlers enough restAlso Read | Watch: Virat Kohli leads Team India’s victory lap as MCG cheers historic triumphlast_img read more

first_imgCardale Jones swings and misses at a softball.Twitter/@STN_Sports Every year, NCAA member schools have to self-report dozens of violations, the vast majority of which are quite inane. Ohio State’s student newspaper The Lantern reports that the school reported 29 minor violations, six of which came from the football program. The most interesting of them centers on quarterback Cardale Jones’ attendance as a celebrity softball game hosted by Cleveland Browns star Joe Haden.Cardale Jones and Prime Time at Joe Haden’s Celebrity softball game pic.twitter.com/tYUaV2G0Gk— Mary Kay Cabot (@MaryKayCabot) June 6, 2015In one case, an OSU football player was told that he was neither permitted to participate in nor attend the Joe Haden Celebrity Charity Softball game in Cleveland on June 6. However, on the morning of the event he called his position coach and was told he could attend the event but not participate.Because the school had not provided written approval to attend, a violation had occurred. An OSU spokesman could not confirm the identity of the player, but redshirt junior quarterback Cardale Jones was documented to have attended the game.In response to the violation, a letter of education was provided to all football coaches and staff emphasizing the rules regarding promotional activities, as well as reviewed with football student-athletes.Braxton Miller’s Instagram photo promoting AdvoCare from the spring was also included in the report. It should be noted that there should not be an repercussions for minor offenses like these, but it is always interesting to look at the things that are deemed violations by the NCAA. Many of them are pretty ridiculous.[The Lantern via Eleven Warriors]last_img read more