Members of Ohio State’s men’s ice hockey team celebrate a goal by freshman forward Tanner Laczynski (9) in the third period of the Buckeye’s game against Bowling Green on Oct. 22. The Buckeyes won 6-1. Credit: Breanna Crye | For The LanternAfter opening the new year with a split series last week against No. 4 Penn State, and cracking the top 10 in the USCHO.com rankings, the 10th-ranked Ohio State men’s hockey team (10-4-4) is set for two nonconference meetings against Arizona State (6-13-0) on Friday and Saturday.The Sun Devils’ hockey program is in just its second year of existence, but has performed well against good opponents. With the Sun Devils facing another top-10 opponents this weekend, OSU coach Steve Rohlik said that win or lose for Arizona State, the Sun Devils impact may be bigger off the ice.“I think it’s really important what they’re doing. They’re the face of expansion,” Rohlik said. “It could be the door out West, and I think all of us in college hockey are hoping for their success because we love to see this game grow.”The Sun Devils are fresh off three straight losses to ranked opponents, including being swept by No. 1 Denver last weekend. Coach Greg Powers’ squad is allowing an average of four goals per game this season, and has been outscored by its opponents 84-47 in 19 games.Despite that, Rohlik said ASU is a quality opponent, and he anticipates two tough games.“I know they work extremely hard, are well-coached. They just started Division I, but they’ve played some awfully good teams pretty darn well,” he said. “They’ve won some games, and I’m impressed with what they’re doing on tape.” Freshman forward Tanner Laczynski returns to the Buckeyes following his appearance with the United States hockey junior team for the World Junior Championships in Canada, where the Stars and Stripes defeated the hosts in the gold medal match in a shootout, 5-4.Headed into the matchup with the Sun Devils, Laczynski said being a newcomer makes them an unfamiliar opponent, but added that he expects them to come ready to work.“They’re going to try to get in the Big Ten in the next couple years, so this is a big game for them,” he said. “They’re going to be ready to play, and we can’t take them lightly. So we’ve got to be ready, just like every game, and play a full 60 minutes both games.”Puck drop at the Schottenstein Center is set for 7 p.m. Friday night, and 2 p.m. Saturday afternoon. read more

first_imgCagliari and Italy starlet Nicolo Barella says the midfielder that was his role model while growing up was ex-Lazio and Inter man Dejan Stankovic.Inter Milan tops the clubs Barella has been rumoured with for a move this month, while Stankovic on his own made over 300 appearances for the Nerazzurri between 2014 and 2013.When he was asked who he most looked up to as a schoolboy, the 21-year-old replied according to Football Italia:“Stankovic.Romelu Lukaku, Inter Milan, Cagliari, Serie AReport: Inter ultra’s claim chants to Lukaku were not racist George Patchias – September 4, 2019 Inter Milan ultras have defended opposition fans of Cagliari as not racist in their monkey chants aimed at Lukaku.This past weekend, after Romelu Lukkku…“I loved his determination as a child. I still remember his great goal from midfield.”Dejan Stankovic’s halfway line volley against Schalke, in the champions league…. 😮🙌🏻⚽️ pic.twitter.com/w6ZcJpzB9j— Titanic Goals (@TitanicGoals) July 31, 2016last_img read more

first_imgThe two-day long UMAK Festival concluded with the melodious sounds of ghungroos, sitar and tabla on Tuesday. This festival ‘for a cause’ is named after one of the greatest sitar maestros of India, Ustad Mushtaq Ali Khan who is also known as the ‘musician’s musician’ and was organised to celebrate his 103rd birth anniversary. The UMAK Centre for Culture which organised this event to aid the ailing of cancer patients in India showcased two grand evenings filled with music and dance. The musicians and dancers included many internationally renowned maestros of India like the Padma Bhushan awardee Pandit Debu Chaudhury, Pandit Prateek Chaudhuri,  Ustad Akram Khan and Ustad Rafiuddin Sabri.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The concluding day of the event saw an interesting mix of  an animated audience with youngsters and elders sitting together being mesmerised by the  performance of the famous sitar player Pandit Prateek Chauhuri. The event which happened at the India habitat Centre also showcased a Santoor Jugalbandi Concert by the internationally renowned santoor maestro Pandit Bhajan Sopori (Padma Shri Awardee) and his son Abhay Sopori. The event also celebrated the 79th birth anniversary of Pandit Debu Chaudhury who is the winner of the prestigious Padmabhushan award. He has written various books on music and has composed eight new ragas and various musical compositions.  He is also regarded as one of the leading proponents of Senia Style (or Gharana).  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix After being felicitated during the event, Pandit Debu Chaudhuri said, ‘It always feels good to be loved by so many people. Music has always been with me and will always be.’The Centre organises the UMAK festival every year and is recognized by the government of India as one of the leading cultural organizations of the country which has been involved in preserving and promoting the rich national heritage and culture of India.last_img read more

first_img The broker can take an investor out of his equity position at its discretion, and sell his stock at the worst possible time if he goes outside of the agreed-upon margin requirements. The amount one can borrow fluctuates minute by minute as stock prices rise and fall. The Securities and Exchange Commission sets the maximum margin requirements and can change them at will. Brokers and their customers must comply immediately. It’s high time investors heed the yellow caution flags waving in front of their margin accounts. Much like the NASCAR driver who pumps his brakes to avoid disaster when he sees the caution flag, it’s time for us to slow down. My friend and colleague Ed Steer, editor of Ed Steer’s Gold & Silver Daily, recently highlighted a must-read Wall Street Journal blog post focusing on the record-high levels of margin debt, and it sure made me pause to think. For those unfamiliar with margin accounts, here’s an explanation in a nutshell: margin debt is money you borrow from your brokerage based on your investments and the balance in your account. In the US, one can legally only borrow up to a 50% margin. For the sake of illustration, assume a hypothetical investor (let’s call him “John”) buys $100,000 of a stock. If John has a signed margin agreement with his broker, he can borrow 50% of that amount from the brokerage. That means that John only needs $50,000 to purchase the full $100,000 of stock. Of course, he also pays interest on his loan. If the stock increases 10%, John has $110,000, earning a $10,000 profit. Based on his original balance of $50,000, that’s a 20% return on his initial capital. This is the way in which margin leverages an account. Furthermore, John could use his new equity to leverage himself even more – the more the stock increases, the more debt he can pile on for yet more risk and leverage. But what happens when the price of one of John’s stocks drops? The losses are similarly doubled as well. Furthermore, if John’s equity reaches the maintenance margin, his broker will issue a margin call, and he will have to come up with the cash immediately to meet the minimum level of the maintenance margin. The maintenance margin is also a percentage and varies from broker to broker. If John can’t come up with the money, his broker has the right to sell part or all of his stock at its current price to bring his account back within the margin requirements. Margin debt is a unique sort of loan: The interest rate is changed by the lender (in this case the broker), and fluctuates with the current cost of money. Investors can pay off the loan by selling their stock. Their broker will deduct whatever amount was owed at the time of sale. Now, why are more investors borrowing increasing amounts against their investment accounts? The author of the WSJ post had one suggestion: “Some see the increase as a sign of speculation, particularly if the borrowed money is reinvested in stocks.” If investing in stocks is not speculative enough for you, you can add to the excitement (and your blood pressure) by speculating with borrowed money. The time to do that is when you have a “sure thing” – an investment that you just know is going to skyrocket. I’ve been there before and learned my lesson the hard way. Don’t Bet the Farm In 1977, I moved to Atlanta. One of the coaches of my son’s baseball team worked for Scientific Atlanta, a hot new technology company at the time. He kept touting the company’s stock, and we watched it go from $16 to $32 per share and split twice in a fairly short time period. He convinced me it was a great opportunity. I took out a second mortgage on my house, borrowed $32,000, and bought 1,000 shares. I figured it would split and double, and I could quickly pay off the mortgage. I would be playing on the house’s money, so to speak. I was right about one thing: the stock was soon selling for $16 per share, but not because it had split. The price dropped in half because they were having serious production problems with one of their main products. Eventually, I sold it off, paid off part of the second mortgage, and cussed at myself for being greedy and stupid for the next several years as I wrote checks to pay off the balance of the loan. I was playing on the house’s money all right – my house! I’m sure we have all heard the stock market described as a house of cards. The increasing level of margin debt is certainly a prime example. Retirees are pouring money into the market because really, there are few other options left for finding decent yield. Now we’re learning that the number of stocks bought on margin is at a record high, meaning a lot of those stocks were purchased with borrowed money. In turn, this has helped push the stock market to all-time highs. Hello! Does anyone remember the Internet boom… and bust? How about the market crash when real estate prices plummeted? A sudden dip in the stock market would mean an awful lot of margin calls. More than likely, few folks would have enough spare cash to put up the additional capital requirements. Brokerage firms would then enter sell orders, at market price, to bring their clients’ accounts back in balance. Those massive sell orders would drive prices down further, causing more sell orders, and soon it would be a full-blown crash. Boom! Just like a house of cards tumbling to the ground. And what happens to the retiree who had invested his life savings, hoping to watch it appreciate while collecting dividends in the process? You know, we old people who bought our stocks with real money, the kind we earned and saved – not the borrowed kind. Our account balances will plummet right along with those of the market speculators. The only difference is that we won’t have the opportunity to recover. The Solution for Conservative Investors Retirees and other conservative investors can protect themselves with a multipronged approach. First, diversification – a topic Vedran and I covered at length in the April issue of Miller’s Money Forever – will help prevent a total wipeout. And while the market may crash, there are still many solid companies making plenty of money and paying fine dividends. Those companies usually rebound much more quickly from a crash or downturn than speculative investments do. Second, stop losses can limit the damage. Stocks don’t all fall at the same rate when the market drops. Many big-name companies owned by pension funds pay good dividends and are less likely to be sold, even in a rapid down cycle. In addition, the Money Forever team also recommends having at least 30-35% of your portfolio in cash and short-term, near-cash instruments. Those contrarians with the courage to buy good companies when others are selling may find themselves in the buying opportunity of a lifetime. If you’re one of these folks and you have the cash to buy, you can profit in a down market. In short, survival comes down to limiting exposure, allocating capital properly, and controlling our emotions. Panic is our worst enemy when times get tough. I was 37 when I gambled with that second mortgage, and I have had 35 years to recover from it. Investors near the retirement cusp cannot afford to borrow money to speculate; the risks are just too high. At this point in life, we have learned the hard lessons. For seniors and folks approaching retirement, preservation and return of capital always trumps return on capital. In Miller’s Money Forever, we cover almost every topic under the sun when it comes to the financial risks facing retirees and those planning for retirement. Whether it’s margin debt, annuities, reverse mortgages, or just finding some good, high-dividend-paying stocks, we leave no stone unturned. Sign up for a free trial today.last_img read more