first_imgSUNDERLAND,MANNONE,YEDLIN, KONE, KABOUL, VAN AANHOLT,KIRCHHOFF,CATTERMOLE, M’VILA,BORINI, DEFOE, KHAZRIWELBECK,SANCHEZ, OZIL, IWOBI,COQUELIN, ELNENY,MONREAL, KOSCIELNY, GABRIEL, BELLERIN,CECHARSENAL (4-2-3-1)This game has become hugely important for both teams. Sunderland, having won 3-0 at relegation rivals Norwich City last Saturday, could move out of the bottom three with a win over Arsenal, whose title aspirations are over and who now face a fight to qualify for the Champions League.Norwich, in 17th place, and 16th-place Crystal Palace, are without league games this weekend so the incentive for a home win is clear.Arsenal, who were at home to West Bromwich Albion last night in a rearranged game, have won just one of their last six away matches in the Barclays Premier League, though they have scored 32 goals on the road so far this season, the most in the division.Indeed, Arsene Wenger’s men have played Sunderland twice this season, both at home, winning 3-1 both in the league, in December, and in the FA Cup a month later.And the Gunners’ record at Sunderland in the Premier League is impressive, with seven wins – including their last four visits to the Stadium of Light – and four draws. They last lost in the league at Sunderland in November 2009 and have scored 19 goals in 14 visits, while the Black Cats have never scored more than one goal – and only eight in total – in those 14 games.Sunderland have a clean bill of health ahead of the game but Arsenal’s injury problems continue. They continue to miss several key players, including Santi Cazorla, Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, Tomas Rosicky and Jack Wilshere.last_img read more

first_img11 June 2012The Springboks gave Heynecke Meyer a winning start in his first match as national coach, beating England 22-17 at Kings Park in Durban on Saturday evening.It was a tight contest and the teams were level at half-time, but the Boks lifted their game in the second half to pull away from the tourists, who scored a late consolation try to pull within seven points of the home side.After the game, Meyer admitted that he had delivered a half-time blast to his charges, which clearly had the desired effect, as South Africa dominated the third quarter of the contest to pull clear.“At some stages I really thought we played great rugby,” he said after the test. “We moved the ball around and I was happy with the result, but we butchered one or two tries and you need to finish those in test match rugby.‘Very high standards’“I think that this team has been so great from the start, they have got very high standards, so, although there were some hard words, they knew that they had to step up in the second half.”Assessing England’s performance, Meyer said: “I thought that England were brillant in the way that they put pressure on the nine [scrumhalf], and they pressed very hard in midfield, so we made a few changes to our tactical kicking in the second half, which worked.“I thought the first 20 minutes they pressed very hard and we should have played more tactically, but the plan was always to open up the game in the second half.“I thought England’s tactical kicking was much better than ours in the first half, they put the ball in behind us and moved us around, so we couldn’t get any quick ball or momentum, but once we changed things in the second half, it went much better.”ScrumsThe Springboks’ tight scrums, especially, were impressive as the front row of Beast Mtawarira, Bismarck du Plessis and Jannie du Plessis ruled the roost. Later, replacements Coenie Oosthuizen and Adriaan Strauss ensured the Springboks remained in the ascendancy.All three South African debutants – Marcell Coetzee, Eben Etzebeth and Juandre Kruger – delivered in their first matches in the green and gold.Importantly, the more established players showed strong leadership and contributed significantly to the South African victory, with men such as captain Jean de Villiers, Bryan Habana and Francois Steyn standing out.England competed intensely at the breakdowns in the first half and did a good job of making matters difficult for the Springboks, but once the Boks started protecting their own ball better and challenging the English ball more effectively, they were able to play more of the game on the front foot.Flyhalf Morne Steyn, very unusually for him, had an off day with the boot in windy conditions. Had he kicked to his usual high standards, the game would not have been as close as the final scoreline suggests it was.The matchEarly on, Habana launched a good counter-attack after fielding a kick. The ball was moved wide to Pietersen, but the big wing was forced into touch.A couple of minutes later, England were awarded a penalty after the Boks were blown up for playing the ball on the ground at a ruck. Owen Farrell took a shot at goal and was successful, putting the tourists into a 3-0 lead.In the 12th minute, flank Willem Alberts made a strong break from a ruck after Habana had put good pressure on fullback Mike Brown from a high-up-and-under launched by flyhalf Steyn. When Alberts went to ground, the English slowed the South African ball and referee Steve Walsh awarded a penalty against them.LevelMorne Steyn was on target with his kick at goal and the sides were level at 3-3.England hit the front once more in the 27th minute after winning a penalty at a breakdown and Farrell again hit the target.South Africa stormed back onto the attack and within three minutes were on level terms once more thanks to a Morne Steyn penalty.Just before the break, Steyn had an opportunity to put South Africa in front, but a shot of goal drifted well wide of the right hand upright.Springbok tryThe Springboks upped their intensity in the second half and it paid off after eight minutes when Morne Steyn went over for a try. It began when captain De Villiers made good ground up the left flank. The ball was then brought back to the right where Alberts broke through a tackle before finding Jannie Du Plessis on the charge.The big prop barrelled towards the tryline, but was stopped just five metres short of the whitewash. Etzebeth did well to make some ground from slow ball and then Patrick Lambie, on for Zane Kirchner, was stopped mere centimetres short of the line.Francois Hougaard was then stopped and Beast Mtawarira came within sniffing distance of the line. The ball was moved right again and Morne Steyn, with JP Pietersen outside of him, sold a dummy before going over for the five-pointer. His conversion attempt passed to the left of the posts and South Africa led 11-6.The men in green and gold had a chance to extend their lead when they won a penalty 10 metres out and right in front of the posts, but scrumhalf Hougaard inexplicably took a quick penalty instead of the almost certain three points, which left coach Meyer gesturing unhappily towards the field.Second tryOn the hour mark, Francois Steyn fielded a high-up-and-under from England scrumhalf Ben Youngs midway between the English 22-metre line and the 10-metre line. He neatly off-loaded to Habana, who hit the ball at speed.When he was tackled midway inside the English 22, Ruan Pienaar, on for Hougaard, moved the ball swiftly to the right. De Villiers received it in space, pinned his ears back, cut in slightly and bashed his way over the line for the Springboks’ second try.South Africa led 16-6 after Steyn missed the conversion, but England were soon within seven points when Farrell slotted a third penalty to make it 16-9.Two penalties by Steyn followed in the next 10 minutes, leaving South Africa 22-12 ahead with only two minutes to play.England tryWith time up, England finally crossed the Springboks’ tryline. They made ground into the South African 22 and forced a ruck before passing the ball out wide to Ben Foden, who crashed over in the corner despite a desperate tackle attempt by Francois Steyn.Farrell’s attempt to go five from five in the difficult kicking conditions was wide and the final whistle sounded with South Africa 22-17 winners.It was hard-hitting contest and unfortunately for England’s South African-born centre Brad Barritt, formerly of the Sharks, he was one of two big casualties for England on the day.SurgeryBarritt suffered a lacerated eyeball, which required surgery. He is, however, expected to be fit for the third test. Fullback Mike Brown injured a thumb and will miss the rest of the series.Zane Kirchner’s fitness is questionable after he injured a knee.The Springboks and England next meet on Saturday at Coca-Cola Park in Johannesburg. Before that, the tourists play a midweek match against the SA Barbarians South in Kimberley on Wednesday.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgCodeMakers teaches learners at schools in Umlazi, eThekwini to understand computer programme coding and in the process tell their stories through creating their own animations, games and interactive stories.The isiZulu option on the Scratch website helps Umlazi learners learn more about coding. Non-profit organisation CodeMakers set it up to help youngsters understand the coding programme better. (Image: CodeMakers)Brand South Africa reporterMore than 700 learners in Umlazi, in eThekwini, KwaZulu-Natal, have learned computer programme coding and have produced animations that tell their stories in their own words and their own language. The skills training was undertaking by the non-profit organisation CodeMakers.The organisation began in 2015 with a pilot of linked courses — coding, cardboard engineering and robotics.Stories told through programmingSpeaking to talk radio 702, CodeMakers founder and executive director Justin Yarrow said the group gave children an opportunity to take apart a piece of technology and build their own. “What we are doing is helping kids in many different ways other than just understanding how coding works.”Scratch, a free visual programming language, is used. Learners are able to create animations, games and interactive stories.“Doing Scratch computer coding is very creative and for kids with curiosity, it gets them to approach problems from a point of logic,” Yarrow told Business Day Live.“It also gets kids to express themselves and letting their stories be told is incredibly important.”This gave children recognition, he said. Through the project, they had found that many children “don’t feel like they can be creators of technology”. CodeMakers wanted to change this.Its goals included helping its learners recognise the power of computers, especially since many South African children left school without ever using a computer, Yarrow said.Currently CodeMakers work with grade 6 to 10 learners of Umkhumbane Secondary School and Bhekaphambili Primary School. “We have worked with or run workshops at the KwaZulu-Natal Society of Arts (KZNSA), eThekwini Municipality Area Based Management Unit, Chesterville Extension Library, Meadowlands Secondary and Wiggins Secondary,” said Yarrow.“In the workshop we did with learners at KZNSA they made stories about what they thought the year 2050 would look like, with talking animals, robots, flying cars, and the extinction of rhinos.”CodeMakers has three inter-linked programmes that teach, inspire and empower learners to understand and pursue studies and careers in science and technology. The programmes are:Skills through hands-on coding classesInspire through video interviews of early career professionalsEmpower through offline internet education resourcesCareers in science and technologyMedical microbiology student Bonisile Luthuli is one of the people profiled by CodeMakers through video interviews. One of her tasks is testing various drugs on tuberculosis (TB) bacteria in the search for those that will kill the bacteria.She was interested in how science kept evolving, Luthuli said. The deaths of relatives from TB had driven her to a career in science, Luthuli said, and she hoped to make a difference by finding a cure for the illness.She works at KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for TB and HIV. “I went to a school that didn’t have a library or computers. I had never touched a computer in my life before I came to university and I had never seen a microscope.”She encourages learners to pursue careers in science and technology. “Go for it, work hard, and focus on your studies,” Luthuli said. “You don’t have to be super smart. You just have to work hard.”Watch Bonisile Luthuli explains what her work entails:Watch a biomedical scientist profiled by CodeMakers:Sources: CodeMakers, Business Day Live, Radio 702 and CodeMakers, YouTube.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

first_imgYMCA releases major research today as it partners with #IAMWHOLE – an NHS anti-stigma campaign fronted by Jordan Stephens (Rizzle Kicks).Ed Sheeran: #IAMWHOLEMore than one in three young people with mental health difficulties experience stigma, according to major new research released by youth charity, YMCA.The I AM WHOLE report published today in support of an NHS anti-stigma campaign being launched by UK music star Jordan Stephens (Rizzle Kicks), also shows that, of the young people who experience this stigma, more than a third say it happens at least once a week and 54% say it originates from their own friends.Researchers spoke to more than 2,000 11 to 24-year-olds and found that 38% of those with mental health difficulties felt they were stigmatised. Of those, 56% said this stigma made them less willing to access professional support for their mental health difficulties and 70% were less likely to speak about their problems.Stigma comes in many forms for young people, including being left out of activities (54%) and verbal abuse (36%). In addition, it also damages confidence (85%) and negatively impacts on their school performance (59%).YMCA’s research supports the #IAMWHOLE campaign that is hoping to combat stigma and normalise mental health difficulties among young people. It is supported by major celebrities, including James Corden, Dermot O’Leary and Ed Sheeran and is asking people to: • Challenge harmful language used to describe mental health difficulties so that young people can ask for help without fear of negative labels. • Ask for support from friends, parents, teachers, GPs or youth workers • Show support by joining the #IAMWHOLE movement on social media and posting ‘circle on hand’ selfies in support of the anti-stigma message • Find and get help by visiting www.findgetgive.com – a mental health services directory for young people created by YMCA’s Right Here project in partnership with other local groups in Jordan’s childhood home of Brighton & Hove. This site allows users to search for support, share stories about their own mental health and give feedback on services they have used for others to read. ‘Find Get Give’ also includes resources for parents and carers. Services are being added to Find Get Give all the time and providers are being encouraged to add their work using the online form.In addition, Jordan has written a new song ‘Whole’ about tackling mental health issues and the #IAMWHOLE campaign features in the song’s music video, along with young people from YMCA’s Right Here mental health project in Brighton.Denise Hatton, Chief Executive of YMCA England, the national council of YMCAs in England and Wales, said: “YMCA’s research backs up conversations we have had with young people in which they have told us mental health is one of the principle worries affecting their generation today.“What is alarming from these findings is the widespread stigma young people are now seeing or experiencing from others that is making them less likely to seek professional help. YMCA’s mental health services make a huge difference to the lives of young people with mental health difficulties but it is clear more needs to be done to support those who are currently slipping through the net.“That’s why I encourage everyone to support #IAMWHOLE to help overcome the stigma we have identified and the negative consequences young people are facing when trying to deal with their mental health difficulties alone.”Jordan Stephens, said: “The #IAMWHOLE campaign message that ‘together we are whole’ is so important and I am pleased to be launching it today on World Mental Health Day.“My mum is a trained therapist so I’ve seen how important it is for people to get the right support and not to feel isolated. I’ve also had friends and people close to me seriously affected by mental health issues. I wrote ‘Whole’ to express how I was feeling at the bottom of a situation. When the NHS suggested it could be used to give other people a way of feeling less alone, man that felt really good.”Other findings from the YMCA’s research report include: • More than three quarters (77%) of young people know someone who has experienced difficulties with their mental health. • Anxiety (66%) and depression (51%) were the most common mental health conditions experienced by young people. • Young people who believe stigma exists believe they can best tackle it by talking more about mental health (64%) and sharing their experiences (60%). • 81% of young people who believe stigma exists say that school is the best place to combat it.Dr Tim Kendall, National Clinical Director for Mental Health for NHS England, said: “A lot of work is being done by the NHS in England to support improvements in children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing, including major investment and service transformation over the next five years.“Reaching out to young people who aren’t coming forward to access services due to fear of stigma is so important and the #IAMWHOLE campaign is helping to start that conversation with young people today online, through social media and an anti-stigma challenge initiative for schools.”last_img read more