first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +2 Vote up Vote down David Edge · 276 weeks ago Glad nobody was hurt during this. Hope this family finds some comfort soon and wish them well as they move forward. My prayers are with you. Report Reply 0 replies · active 276 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Fire causes $30,000 worth of damage.by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — A structure fire caused $30,000 worth of damage to a home at 1003 South Jefferson in Wellington at 2:10 p.m. Thursday.According to a Wellington Fire Department press release, Wellington firefighters arrived on the scene and found a one-and-a-half story green colored wood frame home on fire with flames coming through the windows and doorway on two sides of the house.The home is owned by Andrew Gerten.The fire was extinguished at the rear of the home. Firefighters then made entry to search for any victims. They then started the ventilation of the smoke process by cutting a section of the roof away and inserting a ventilation fan. Firefighters worked for another hour extinguishing areas within the attic and walls which were smoldering.The fire was declared under control at 2:51 p.m.Wellington Fire Chief Tim Hay said there was extensive fire damage to the rear of the home and smoke/heat damage throughout the structure. There was damage to the privacy fence and siding on a neighboring homes.Estimated damage to the structure and contents totaled $30,000, Hay said.The fire started near clothes dryers on the back porch, Hay said.Belle Plaine Fire District #9 assisted with the fire. There were two engines, one ladder, one medic, one rescue and two pickups at the scene with 12 fire personnel working.There were no injuries.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgWith the credibility of the game in question, fans rightly disgusted and Congress threatening action, Major League Baseball is finally getting serious about players’ steroid use. On Tuesday, the players’ union conceded to Commissioner Bud Selig’s demands for a tough steroids policy. Under the new plan, testing will be increased, and a first offense will lead to a 50-game suspension. Two offenses equals a 100-game suspension, and with a third strike, the player is out of the game for life. That means fans can now watch baseball knowing that the athleticism on display is real, not juiced. And parents no longer need to worry that their kids will think the way to become a big league player is to abuse their bodies with drugs. Baseball is cleaning up its act, and for that we can all cheer. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Weeklast_img read more

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – A memorial service for Camilla Simmons, who came to Whittier 79 years ago at the age of 14, will be held Wednesday at Quaker Gardens Chapel, 12151 Dale St., Stanton. Simmons died Nov. 17 at age 93. She was born to Daisy Dixon Vincent and Clifford T. Vincent on July 10, 1912, in Cortez, Colo. She also lived in the Colorado towns of Paonia, La Jara and Grand Junction before coming to California with her parents and older brother, Dixon (Dick) Vincent. After graduating from Whittier High School, Camilla attended Whittier College, graduating in the class of 1934, the same class as Richard M. Nixon. During her college years, she was president of the Palmer Society and also was elected Queen of the May. Because these were the years of the Great Depression, Camilla lived at home and worked her way through college with a job at Carnegie Whittier Public Library. She met her future husband, William L. Simmons, during college. They were married Oct. 24, 1935. They owned a citrus ranch in East Whittier for 14 years, during which time their two daughters were born. They sold the ranch and built a new home in East Whittier’s Friendly Hills. They lived there for 37 years and then moved to Quaker Gardens in Stanton. The Simmons were active members of East Whittier Friends Church. During her years in Whittier, Simmons also was active in United Society of Friends Women, PEO Chapter BJ, PTA, Girl Scouts, Los Angeles County Well Baby Clinic, and, since moving to Stanton, the Quaker Gardens Board of Directors, president of the Residents Association and secretary and chairman of Women’s Fellowship. Among her hobbies were traveling, painting, writing, water skiing, gardening and sewing. She is survived by daughters Elaine Simmons of Boise, Idaho, and Janet Cunningham of Kimmell, Ind., six grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bill, and her brother, Dick Vincent. From staff reportslast_img read more

first_imgStanford scientists are blaming evolution for our difficulty at golf, according to The Stanford Daily.  Working with rhesus monkeys, the researchers found that primate brains are too adaptable to changing conditions to become good at a repetitive tasks.  “One possible explanation for the observation is that evolution favored predators who could improvise, as they never face an identical situation twice when hunting prey,” explained reporter Daniel Novinson.  But with the D word designed used twice by Mark Churchland, what is the message?“The nervous system was not designed to do the same thing over and over,” said Churchland, a co-author of the study, to the Washington Post.  “The nervous system was designed to be flexible.  You typically find yourself doing things you’ve never done before.”Apparently no one asked the traditional follow-up question, “Who designed the designer?”Some weeks we may need a category for Stupid Evolution Quote of the Day.  Did it never cross their designed minds that a flexible nervous system is a good example of purposeful design?  Why give Charlie Chance the credit?  Meanwhile, if you hit the sand trap, blame yourself, not evolution.  Golf would not have evolved.  It has negative survival value.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more