first_imgBranislav Ivanovic’s fourth goal in six games gave Chelsea a deserved half-time lead at Stamford Bridge.The right-back turned the ball in from close range after a sublime run and cross from the outstanding Eden Hazard.And Ivanovic also looked like he should have won a penalty for the Premier League leaders soon after when his goalbound shot was stopped by the outstretched arm of Burnley winger Michael Kightly.Chelsea, chasing a 12th home win in 13 Premier League games, made a decent start and could have gone ahead within five minutes.But Clarets goalkeeper Tom Heaton did well to tip over Juan Cuadrado’s header from a Filipe Luis cross.At the other end, Thibaut Courtois made a routine save from a spectacular long-range Ashley Barnes strike.However, the majority of attacking threat was coming from the home side.Cesc Fabregas, playing in a deeper role to accommodate Cuadrado, was dictating play and allowing the Chelsea to dominate possession.And after Ivanovic’s opener, Oscar had a shot saved from the edge of the box, Ivanovic was denied what looked a clear spot-kick while Diego Costa also claimed a penalty after going down under a challenge from Jason Shackell.Kurt Zouma and Luis were restored to the starting line-up, while Costa returned up front after completing his three-game domestic ban.It meant Gary Cahill and Cesar Azpilicueta dropped to the bench, while Willian is also a substitute following a recent injury. Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Zouma, Terry, Filipe Luis; Matic, Fabregas; Cuadrado, Oscar, Hazard; Costa. Subs: Cech, Azpilicueta, Cahill, Ramires, Willian, Drogba, Remy.  Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgNigerian surfer and instructor Godpower Pekipuma was born in Tarkwa Bay, the small beach community close to Lagos harbour, where man-made shipping inlets have helped to create naturalistic swells, perfect for surfing.pic.twitter.com/IDLxEDUib6— Godpower Pekipuma (@alloy_92938) February 3, 2016While surfing may not be the most popular sport in Nigeria, the young surfers Pekipuma teaches in the bay are discovering the natural thrill of the sport. He teaches 15 students, some as young as five, to tame the waves of Tarkwa, using borrowed, donated and makeshift boards.Young boys practice #surfing at the #tarkwa bay #lagos #nigeria #snapitoga #everydayafrica pic.twitter.com/8Qo2rtENjh— Snap It Oga (@snapitoga) July 8, 2016“It’s hard to practise more, because we don’t want to break our boards,” Pekipuma told BBC News. It’s the reason he wants to build a small local industry around the sport and the community, teaching residents to build boards. He is also planning on opening a surf shop where surfers can get advice and encouragement.Here’s What Beach Surfing On The Beaches Of Tarkwa Bay In Lagos Lokks Likehttps://t.co/P8dN8K8Pv9 pic.twitter.com/4DssuEjQ8D— Farabale (@FarabaleNow) April 28, 2016Together with Italian-born surf-tourist John Micheletti, Pekipuma also wants to spread the word to the international surfing community, both amateur and professional, inviting them to discover surfing, the Nigerian way.Tarkwa Bay local, John Michelleti, sent us a postcard update from Nigeria. Read it here – http://t.co/uUYDWF5aRd pic.twitter.com/v0qgAuDByB— Zigzag – SA Surf Mag (@Zigzagsurf) August 20, 2015Micheletti, who divides his time between the waves of Cape Town and Lagos, spreading the gospel of Tarkwa Bay to his fellow surfing journeymen, is determined to get the surfing world to experience the unique African surf culture. He told BBC News: “We want the world to see what we are doing, in our own humble way.”The sport is becoming popular enough that even the local film industry, known as Nollywood, is getting in on the action – recruiting Pekipuma, Micheletti and their students to make a surfing-themed movie titled The Ghost of Tarkwa Bay in 2017.Watch the BBC interview with Godpower Pekipuma and John Micheletti about surfing at Tarkwa Bay:Watch a CNN interview with Godpower Pekipuma about life as a surfer in Nigeria:Watch a short film about surfing Tarkwa Bay by surf tourist Armando Abraham, featuring John Micheletti and a great afro-funk soundtrack:Be inspired by a collection of Tarkwa surfing photos, courtesy of Godpower Pekipuma’s Facebook page:Source: BBC NewsSouthAfrica.info reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A new Ohio law affects farmers that plan to use certain utility vehicles this planting season, including Gators, Mules and other utility vehicles with a bed designed to transport cargo. The new law is part of the 2018-2019 transportation budget, formally known as House Bill 26. HB 26, which goes into effect on June 30, 2017, permits vehicles to travel on any public road or right of way — other than a freeway, when travelling from one farm field to another for agricultural purposes.Under HB 26, utility vehicles are now expressly required to display a triangular Slow-Moving Vehicle (SMV) emblem. Previously, it was up to local law enforcement to interpret the law and decide whether a utility vehicle should have a SMV. The new law also clearly allows utility vehicles to travel on public roads between farm fields, whereas the old law required farmers to know whether the county or township allowed utility vehicles on the road. Utility vehicle operators can read more about the old law in our previous blog post on APVs, ATVs, and four-wheelers here.What qualifies as a “utility vehicle?” Farmers should be aware that this law only covers what it defines as “utility vehicles.” This means that the law only applies to vehicles designed with a bed, for transporting material or cargo related to agricultural activities. Not all ATVs and APVs will be included in this definition.The law is good news for farmers who plan to use utility vehicles this season. If farmers plan to use a utility vehicle on the farm, they should know the following before taking the vehicle out:In order to use a utility vehicle on a public road, a driver must be traveling from one farm field to another farm field for agricultural purposes.Utility vehicle drivers must display a SMV on any utility vehicle used on a public road as it travels between farm fields.Ohio Revised Code Section 5589.10 prohibits the placement of earth, mud, manure, or other injurious materials on a public highway. Therefore, farmers should avoid leaving such debris in the roadway or clean up the roadway if a utility vehicle leaves mud behind.More information on HB 26 is here, under Sec. 4511.216 on page 328 of the bill.last_img read more