first_imgThe expo gives students a chance to learn about the many different stages of film and television production, like how green screens allow editors almost limitlessly manipulate an actor and his or her suroundings. (Image: M-Net)There is much about the broadcasting industry that has the potential to pique the interest of the youth, whether it be a fascination with the stars they watch every day on their television screens, a curiosity about the industry’s inner workings, or how the images get to their screens in the first place.In an attempt to ignite this potential and expose schoolchildren to the possibilities of a career in the industry, television network M-Net will extend its Magic in Motion (MiM) career expo from Johannesburg to Durban and Cape Town. The expo began at Johannesburg’s Sci-Bono Discovery Centre in Newtown on 11 August, and ends today. It then moves to Durban, where it will be hosted at the KZN Science Centre from 18 to 21 August; finally it will be at the Cape Town Science Centre from 25 to 28 August.“Our new partnership with M-Net is an exciting achievement for Sci-Bono, and we are thrilled to work with Africa’s leading television broadcaster,” said David Kramer, the chief executive officer of the discovery centre.The expo gives students a chance to learn about the many different stages of film and television production, and how a programme or film makes it from concept to finished product. Pupils interested in pursuing a career in the industry can understand how and where they feel they belong in the bigger picture.“The MiM Career Expo provides an eye-opening view of the many roles that exist within the film and television industry,” explained M-Net chief executive officer Yolisa Phahle.Stages of production demonstrated during the expo include production commissioning, concept creation, script writing, producing, directing, cinematography, sound, art direction (décor, wardrobe, make-up), editing, post-production and broadcasting. It includes business support functions such as human resources, finance, legal services and IT, and technical support, which covers the role of engineers in the filmmaking process.Phahle pointed out that the film industries in Nigeria and the United States made significant contributions to their respective economies. “Our industry has the potential to do the same, yet many do not realise the opportunities that exist.“M-Net is passionate about developing local talent and we are looking forward to meeting the next generation of South African filmmakers. Additionally we have seen how entrepreneurial this business is and [we] are committed to providing opportunities that will allow new production companies to enter the industry as this is how jobs are created.”Essentially, growing interest in the industry of film and television production may lead to the industry itself growing. In turn, this will create more jobs for the youth, who struggle to find employment. It will also help to strengthen South Africa’s economy.EXPECTATIONSM-Net’s human resources director, Fhulufhelo Badugela, said the expo facilitators expected to see about 7 200 students, more than twice the number that came through the door in 2014 because this year the expo was visiting three of the country’s major cities.“We are also very pleased that our 12 Magic in Motion Academy interns, who are halfway through their 12-month programme, will also be functioning as technical support at the MiM Career Expo, putting into practice some what they have learnt so far,” said Badugela.Explaining the function of Sci-Bono, Kramer said the aim was to increase the youth’s awareness of the options they had in the fields of science and technology once they completed school. “As a major player in the broadcasting industry and an esteemed content provider, M-Net is in the best position to give young people a broad view of the television industry,” he added.FAMILIAR FACESActors Zakhele Stanley Mabasa-Mokone and Enest Thabani Gumede, as Skhaleni and Ntandane on the set of M-Net’s Mzansi Magic show Isibaya. (Image: M-Net)To lend a hand in bringing the expo to life, actors Zakhele Stanley Mabasa-Mokone and Enest Thabani Gumede, perhaps better known as Skhaleni and Ntandane from M-Net’s Mzansi Magic show Isibaya, are taking part in the Johannesburg leg of the expo. The colleagues are offering interested students a chance to work alongside them in a mock shoot, in which the pupils play the role of extras.This adds a practical element to their experience and helps to build a further understanding of the processes involved in production and the art of post-production.For more information on the MiM Career Expo, visit M-Net Magic in Motion or find it on Facebook and Twitter.last_img read more

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting curt hopkins Related Posts Tags:#TWiOT#web center_img Before covering the events that have taken place this week in Egypt, I think it’s important to examine those stories that are in danger of being lost to the public’s consciousness because of the dramatic nature of what’s happening in Tahrir Square. Also, in one case, it’s instructive to talk about one case which came about as a direct result of Egypt. In fact, let’s start there, with Syria. Syria lifts Internet bans. Syria is an enthusiastic banner of social media tools. Facebook and YouTube have been banned in that authoritarian country for four years. But now, that ban has been lifted. This is a result of the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings. Like those countries, Syria has labored under a prolonged tinhorn tyranny; in this case, it has endured two generations of Assad-family rule. Perhaps it’s hoped this relaxation will act as a pressure release. Perhaps it is also hoped that trouble-makers in the Syrian regime will be more easily identified if they are lured out in the virtual open. “It seems like a policy to curry favor with the youth,” Syrian dissident Ammar Abdulhamid told us. The relaxation was accompanied by the announcement of a food subsidy for the needy. Thailand prosecutes another blogger under lèse majesté. The trail for the prosecution of Chiranuch Premchaiporn, the webmaster of the Prachatai website, is ongoing. The charge of lèse majesté is a popular one in Thailand when the government finds anyone it wishes to muzzle. The charge is one of bad mouthing the king and queen, who are very popular in Thailand. It is the Thai equivalent of “insulting the leader” or “insulting religion.” Burma sentences imprisoned blogger to more time. Kaung Myat Hlaing, known by the blogging name of Nat Soe, has been sentenced to an additional ten year sentence on top of the two years he’s already serving. In a secret “trial,” Hlaing was convicted of being part of a poster campaign in support of dissident Aung San Suu Kyi and others. He was deprived of food and water for ten days until he “confessed” to being part of the postering group. China bans “Egypt” as search term. Most of the countries terrified by the people who are rising up in Tunisia and Egypt are Arab ones, like Saudi Arabia. But China is nothing if not forward thinking and accounts of people forcing their governments to account are definitely outre in the Middle Kingdom. So “Egypt” has joined “Tiananmen” and “falun gong” as banned terms on the Chinese Internet. Malaysia announces Internet censorship regime. The Malaysian government is drawing up “guidelines” (read: laws) for online behavior (read: speech). The fact that these rules are in conjunction with the country’s Sedition Act tells you everything you need to know about the motivation behind them. Blogging is popular in Malaysia and several of its more prominent bloggers eventually even ran for office; one of them, Jeff Ooi, becoming a member of the Malaysian parliament, which makes the limitations all the more unfortunate. American university a hot-bed of censorship. No country lives up to its ideals, but when the place where those ideals are most openly trodden on is the country’s university system, you know something’s wrong. The U.S. is big on free speech, enshrining it in the country’s highest law, the Constitution. But over the past decade or more, more and more university systems have outlawed speech that is “offensive.” Offensive speech is the only speech that requires constitutional and legal guarantee of course. The right to say “good morning” or “nice shoes” or “I like sunshine” is not one likely to be abrogated. The University of Massachusetts Amherst has made – I swear I am not making this up – on-campus rallies on “controversial” subjects (vague, much?) subject to a set of regulations that make them difficult if not impossible to stage. That’s right. At this point, it is easier for Egyptians to protest for the end of the Mubarak regime than UM students to protest against the continuation of U.S. presence in Iraq. I would call the administration of the University of Massachusetts a bunch of douchebags but it probably breaks the school’s speech code. This week in Egypt characterized by blogger abductionsSandmonkey abducted, beaten, freed. Well-known Egyptian blogger Sandmonkey was “arrested,” beaten up, then let go. His blog was also hit, “due to problems related to traffic and attacks (many from IPs in Saudi Arabia),” and has been taken offline “temporarily suspended until the problems can be resolved.” That was on the third; a post appeared again on the sixth. Kareem Amer. Kareem was a cause celebre internationally. He served four years in Egyptian prison for criticizing Islam as well as his country’s leadership. Although many Mideast youth defended his right to speak his mind and conscious, he was reviled in the Egyptian press and elsewhere. He was beaten and otherwise ill-treated by his jailers, repeatedly during his time in jail. He went missing around 11:00 p.m. local time on February 6 after leaving Tahrir Square with a friend. Wael Ghonim. The Google middle eastern marketing executive was held blindfolded by Egyptian security forces for 12 days. When he was released, he admitted to being one of the founders of the We are all Khaled Said group, whose Facebook page organized a lot of the protests. His subsequent TV interviews and speeches have rejuvenating a protest movement that showed signs of flagging before Ghonim was released. What do you like about This Week in Online Tyranny? What would you like to see more of? Less of? How can we make it more interesting and more useful to you? Please let us know in the comments.Tahrir photo via Al Jazeera | Assad photo via Wikimedia Commons | Burmese protest photo by Alan Chan | UMass photo via Wikimedia Commons | Kareem photo via Cyberdissidents.org Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more