first_imgUrticating caterpillars give you hives. No, really.You may recognize the term “hives” as the red, itchy, stinging,swollen areas of skin that have tortured you or someone you know.The technical term for hives is urticaria. And a number of thingscan cause it.One cause you probably wouldn’t think of is a caterpillar.Urticating caterpillars are moth larvae that get their name fromthe fact that they sting people in a way that produces urticaria.These creepy crawlers have hollow spines that hold an irritatingfluid that causes stinging and burning in a person’s skin. InGeorgia, urticating caterpillars show up in the late summer andfall. The two most common in Georgia are the saddleback and pusscaterpillars.Saddleback caterpillarThe saddleback (Sibine stimulea) is the one most oftenencountered. The full-grown caterpillar is striking. It’s about 1inch long, and the middle of the body is green with a white orcream margin and a large, oval, dark brown spot in the center,also with a white margin. The white-bordered brown spot lookslike a saddle and blanket, giving it its name.Its startling color scheme doesn’t hide the fact that it bristleswith spines. It has pairs of dark brown, spiny “horns” on thefront and rear ends. And in-between are small clumps of spinesalong the lower margin of the green area.Saddlebacks are generally solitary feeders. However, early-stagelarvae may be somewhat gregarious. They show up in many trees,shrubs and other plants, including corn. But they’re most commonon oaks, elms, dogwoods and various fruit trees.Their sting produces an immediate burningsensation, followed by inflammation, swelling and a red rash.Puss caterpillarThe puss caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis) looks alittle like something the cat might have coughed up. It’s hairy.Really hairy. It’s more than an inch long, with short, toxicspines hidden underneath its brown or gray fur. The hairs at therear end form a tail-like tuft, with the head tucked under thefront.Puss caterpillars feed on oaks, pecans, persimmon, fruit trees,roses and other trees and shrubs. They’re typically loners,although you may find several on a given tree.These little dusters only look like harmless hair balls. Theyactually cause the most painful and severe reaction of anyurticating species in the United States.When your skin brushes against the puss caterpillar, the spinesbreak off, releasing an irritating fluid that produces animmediate stinging, burning sensation. The numbness and swellingthat follow may extend to your whole arm or leg in severe cases.Red blotches may persist for a couple of days, accompanied by aweeping rash. Associated lymph nodes may swell and be tender for12 to 24 hours. Systemic reactions may include nausea andvomiting.What to doIf you’re gardening, mowing the lawn, picking fruit or working inother ways in which you might brush against urticatingcaterpillars, wear long pants, long-sleeve shirts and gloves.If one stings you, treat the symptoms. To remove any spines stillin the skin, gently stick a piece of adhesive tape to the siteand then pull it away. Applying cold compresses can lessen thepain and swelling.Over-the-counter pain medications and topical hydrocortisonecreams may help. If the symptoms include systemic reactions ordon’t begin to ease up a couple of days, contact a physician.last_img read more

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr When it comes to loan originations, credit unions are leading the pack. According to an analysis of NCUA and FDIC data conducted by the Washington-based consulting firm Callahan & Associates, credit unions originated almost twice as many loans as banks did in the second quarter of 2015. Do you know what that means for you?If your credit union was a part of that big bump earlier this year, or if you want your CU to get in on more of the action, then take note. CUs have an advantage over commercial banks with a more member-focused and less sales-oriented approach. But, there is more to the story than not being overly pushing with marketing tactics.The fact that CUs are keeping pace with mobile banking loan applications is aiding in healthy loan originations. But offering creative lending solutions that are supported with technology is just the beginning.Successful institutions are bringing in younger applicants with mobile apps that provide instant mobile lending decisions at their fingertips. Going paperless from the initial stages of a loan request through servicing can be achieved with the right core technology and subsequent integrated apps in place.When it comes to loan originations, credit unions are leading the pack. According to an analysis of NCUA and FDIC data conducted by the Washington-based consulting firm Callahan & Associates, credit unions originated almost twice as many loans as banks did in the second quarter of 2015. Do you know what that means for you?If your credit union was a part of that big bump earlier this year, or if you want your CU to get in on more of the action, then take note. CUs have an advantage over commercial banks with a more member-focused and less sales-oriented approach. But, there is more to the story than not being overly pushing with marketing tactics.The fact that CUs are keeping pace with mobile banking loan applications is aiding in healthy loan originations. But offering creative lending solutions that are supported with technology is just the beginning.Successful institutions are bringing in younger applicants with mobile apps that provide instant mobile lending decisions at their fingertips. Going paperless from the initial stages of a loan request through servicing can be achieved with the right core technology and subsequent integrated apps in place. continue reading »last_img read more

first_img Related Stories Maltz returns to mix for balanced offense against ArmyGoaltenders Wardwell, Somers shine as Syracuse knocks off ArmyFour-goal 2nd quarter paves way in Syracuse’s win over Army Published on February 24, 2013 at 11:16 pm Contact David: [email protected] | @DBWilson2 Facebook Twitter Google+center_img A week ago, the Syracuse defense was embarrassed. The unit was dismantled by Albany’s three-headed offensive monster of Thompsons – Lyle, Miles and Ty – allowing 16 goals in the Orange’s double-overtime loss.Not on Sunday. The SU defense redeemed itself by shutting down Army and its goal-scoring machine, Garrett Thul.“Army playing three or four games before this one, we had tons of film on them, and I think the coaches did a great job getting us in before practices, after practices, putting in that extra time and it really paid off,” Syracuse defender Brian Megill said. “Getting the defenses together and really start jelling.”The Orange (1-1) defense that was shamed on its home turf just a week before rebounded in front of 3,614 against the Black Knights (2-2) on Saturday in the Carrier Dome. No. 18 SU held Army to just a pair of goals in its 6-2 victory — tied for the fewest in Dome history. In the process, SU brought an end to Thul’s 42-game goal-scoring streak that dates back to April 2010.Army never recorded more than seven shots in a quarter. A week ago, Albany shot 45 times against Syracuse. The Thompson clan alone shot 25 times – as many as the Black Knights had as a team.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I was surprised as anybody to see last week’s score scouting the game,” Army head coach Joe Alberici said. “I think that, that was going to be the strength of their unit – of their team — is their defense. I think even walking out of the Carrier Dome last week, I felt like that was a strength.”The early going was a stark contrast from the frantic tempo that persisted throughout the Orange’s season-opener. The first goal didn’t come for more than 10 minutes. Syracuse didn’t allow a goal until the 8:15 mark of the second quarter, leading 3-0.“After last week, we were very disappointed,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said. “The guys wanted to come out and play today. I thought we prepped well, and they were excited to play.”In a defensive struggle, the Orange exploded for four goals in the second quarter to enter the break in control 5-2. A third-quarter goal gave Syracuse a 6-2 lead heading into the final frame. If the defense could finish the game as strongly as it had played for 45 minutes, the four-goal cushion would be more than enough.Two minutes into the final quarter came the defense’s toughest test. A push by defender David Hamlin gave the Black Knights a 30-second extra-man opportunity and their best chance of the game.But SU held firm. Defender Brandon Mullins nearly forced a turnover at the top of the offensive zone. Black Knights midfielder Alex Newsome scooped up the ground ball, but his off-balance shot sailed wide after the penalty released. Syracuse survived.“It boosts confidence a little bit,” SU goaltender Bobby Wardwell said. “I think the defense did a really good job keeping them on the outside.”After the Thompsons repeatedly gashed the Orange defense en route to the 16-goal explosion, it became the task of the SU defense to slow the Black Knights’ dynamic attacks, namely Thul and John Glesener.Stopping Glesener meant a start for Mullins. He could play down low or up top to keep up with the converted midfielder.There was nothing in particular to do against Thul. It would simply take a stalwart effort from the Syracuse defense and its star Megill to stop the previously unstoppable.Megill kept him off balance and away from the net. Thul committed four turnovers, all caused by Megill. He got off five shots, but quality opportunities were rare.When Army needed quick goals, Thul tried to create. The clock ticked below two minutes, and Thul tried to work his way to the net. The Orange kept him at bay, forcing the attack to shoot from 10 yards out – another easy save for Wardwell on a day when that was all he saw.“I think the Syracuse Orange defense as a whole shut down Thul,” Megill said. “We had a game plan coming in, we watched last week, we knew who they were.“We knew that they were gunslingers and we had to pressure out, kind of deny the ball a little bit. I think the defense as a whole did a great job this week, coming together.” Commentslast_img read more