first_img Is China Making Progress on Phase One Deal? We’ll Know More Next Week Previous articlePurdue Sophomore Wins Farm Bureau Collegiate Discussion Meet and the Risks of Planting in Upcoming Cold Weather on the HAT Thursday Morning EditionNext articleFarm Bankruptcies on the Rise Amid COVID-19 Pandemic NAFB News Service SHARE Facebook Twitter Beijing hasn’t yet removed many of its dumping duties on U.S. imports. Trump recently told reporters that he’d be able to tell them within the next two weeks if he’s happy with how the trade deal is progressing. Home Indiana Agriculture News Is China Making Progress on Phase One Deal? We’ll Know More Next… By NAFB News Service – May 7, 2020 The planned phone call will be the first time the Chinese Vice Premier and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will talk about the agreement since it was signed in January. That was just before COVID-19 hit the world’s two largest economies and turned the world’s global supply chains upside down. Facebook Twitter Trade numbers this week showed a sharp drop in U.S. exports to China when compared to the 2017 benchmark levels, which in turn caused doubt that Beijing would meet its obligation to buy at least $262 billion in U.S. agriculture, manufacturing, and energy goods. Top negotiators from China and the U.S. will talk next week about the progress on the Phase One Trade Deal between the two countries. Bloomberg says the move comes after President Donald Trump threatened to terminate the agreement if Beijing doesn’t meet its obligations. Relations have been strained since the coronavirus outbreak. Trump says China misled the world about the scope and risk of the disease. China says U.S. officials are trying to “shift their responsibility for the poor handling of the disease.” SHARElast_img read more

first_img View post tag: HMAS Darwin Share this article View post tag: News by topic HMS Somerset and HMAS Darwin Meet HMS Somerset and HMAS Darwin, the two top naval crime fighters in the Indian Ocean have met and shared their experiences of half a dozen drugs busts. Authorities View post tag: HMS Somerset Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Somerset and HMAS Darwin Meet center_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: meet View post tag: Navy June 4, 2014 View post tag: europe Between them they have accounted for seizing £240m of illegal narcotics in the past two months.The duo, directed by a Royal UK Navy-led task force, have ensured more than two and half tonnes of heroin and hashish will never reach their destination – or fund the activities of terrorists.The Darwin scored five busts in five weeks – including the biggest ever haul of heroin seized on the Seven Seas – with an estimated street value of over £230m.HMS Somerset added to the haul last week when she snared 60kg of heroin worth some £8.5m in the UK.With 10 busts since January and six since the Royal Navy’s Maritime Battle Staff took charge of Combined Task Force 150 – committed to clamping down on terrorism and drug trafficking in the region – its Commanding Officer Cdre Jeremy Blunden said the international effort had, “Dealt a significant blow to the drug smugglers.”He continued: “I am delighted that the team has already achieved so much – we know that heroin trafficked through East Africa reaches the shores of the UK, which makes this early success very satisfying for the Royal Navy officers and sailors serving here.”In a brief pause in operations, Darwin and Somerset joined up allowing the boarding teams from both to discuss the best methods for tackling the drugs problem – and some of the tricks used by smugglers to hide their illegal transport.Eleven sailors from HMAS Darwin headed to the Devonport-based frigate, while nine of Somerset’s commandos headed in the opposite direction.In addition the command team from the Darwin met their opposite numbers on the Type 23 frigate.“Working closely with our task force partners and understanding how we each do business is fundamental to continuing our success in combatting illegal drug movement across the Indian Ocean,” said Cdr Mike Smith, HMS Somerset’s Commanding Officer.“As single ships we can be successful, but by working together we will make a real difference in this region.”Darwin’s Operations Officer, Lieutenant Commander Barton Harrington added: “The cross-deck meeting presented the opportunity to exchange ideas about boardings at a tactical level. It was a highly beneficial meeting.”While 10 years apart in age – HMS Somerset at 20 is the younger – the two warships have much in common; they are roughly the same size, have similar abilities and roles and are crewed by similar numbers of personnel. They’re also both celebrating their birthdays in the next few weeks.HMS Somerset is in the final stage of a six-month deployment east of Suez, the majority of which has been spent in the Gulf on maritime security duties. She’s due home in Devonport early next month.[mappress]Press Release, June 04, 2014; Image: UK Navylast_img read more

first_img“During their coursework, the knowledge they obtain gives them intensive training in Naval Sciences, complemented by their knowledge of engineering and the humanities.” Activities planned at each host country Carrying 67 Peruvian Navy Cadets and 231 crew members on board, the Lupo Class, FM-52 frigate has already visited Colombia (Bahía Málaga) and Mexico (Acapulco), and will continue on to the United States (San Francisco, San Diego, and Seattle), Canada (Vancouver), Panama (Balboa), and Ecuador (Guayaquil) with the goal of providing practical experience for the fourth-year Cadets, said Captain Carlos Saz García, chief of the Academic Instruction department of the Peruvian Naval School. Carrying 67 Peruvian Navy Cadets and 231 crew members on board, the Lupo Class, FM-52 frigate has already visited Colombia (Bahía Málaga) and Mexico (Acapulco), and will continue on to the United States (San Francisco, San Diego, and Seattle), Canada (Vancouver), Panama (Balboa), and Ecuador (Guayaquil) with the goal of providing practical experience for the fourth-year Cadets, said Captain Carlos Saz García, chief of the Academic Instruction department of the Peruvian Naval School. The Cadet Ensign acknowledged he misses his home and family while participating in the tour, but also that every seaman needs to learn to be away from their loved ones while on Naval duty. They’ll have plenty to keep them busy in the meantime: when they arrive at each port, the Peruvian Cadets and host countries will participate in ceremonies, greetings, sports and other social activities, with receptions provided by host nation authorities. “They will also perform operational functions such as rotating coverage of guard posts at sea and in port, and emergency and operational battle stations,” said Capt. Saz García. That rotation will move through one post under each of the Naval Unit’s departments. The Peruvian Navy’s guided-missile frigate BAP Villavicencio (FM-52) departed on May 2 for VIEX-2015, a foreign instructional tour through the Americas that will extend until July 14. The Cadets will practice a wide array of skills during VIEX-2015, including administrative tasks. The Cadets will practice a wide array of skills during VIEX-2015, including administrative tasks. “This training will complement the theoretical knowledge the Cadets gained during their academic coursework, and will allow them to obtain the skills necessary to perform their duties after their graduation, in operational and administrative roles, as officers assigned to a Naval unit.” “Naval Officers must also acquire knowledge about the shipboard routine of a combat unit at port and at sea, techniques and procedures for navigation, naval kinematics, and ship maneuverability to navigate safely with the support of electronic equipment, instruments, publications and nautical maps, as well as knowledge about the functional organization of a combat unit and guard duties at sea and in port.” Cadet Ensign Diego Bartra Cerna, commander of the Angamos Battalion, said the instructional tour offered a chance to put what he had learned into practice. “We are a combat unit, so these trainings are routine, and the tour shows us the day-to-day demands of life at sea.” “Here we are learning to apply everything we learned in the classroom; we are shown what real life is like during maneuvers, how demanding they are, what relationships with the crew are like, and it gives us a broad overview of the place where we will soon be working,” Cadet Ensign Bartra said. Cadet Ensign Diego Bartra Cerna, commander of the Angamos Battalion, said the instructional tour offered a chance to put what he had learned into practice. “We are a combat unit, so these trainings are routine, and the tour shows us the day-to-day demands of life at sea.” The Peruvian Navy’s guided-missile frigate BAP Villavicencio (FM-52) departed on May 2 for VIEX-2015, a foreign instructional tour through the Americas that will extend until July 14. The Cadet Ensign acknowledged he misses his home and family while participating in the tour, but also that every seaman needs to learn to be away from their loved ones while on Naval duty. They’ll have plenty to keep them busy in the meantime: when they arrive at each port, the Peruvian Cadets and host countries will participate in ceremonies, greetings, sports and other social activities, with receptions provided by host nation authorities. “This training will complement the theoretical knowledge the Cadets gained during their academic coursework, and will allow them to obtain the skills necessary to perform their duties after their graduation, in operational and administrative roles, as officers assigned to a Naval unit.” Activities planned at each host country That knowledge includes information about operating principles; the characteristics and criteria for maintenance, systems and equipment; the language the Navy uses on board a vessel; and training in leadership skills. “They will also perform operational functions such as rotating coverage of guard posts at sea and in port, and emergency and operational battle stations,” said Capt. Saz García. That rotation will move through one post under each of the Naval Unit’s departments. By Dialogo June 09, 2015 That knowledge includes information about operating principles; the characteristics and criteria for maintenance, systems and equipment; the language the Navy uses on board a vessel; and training in leadership skills. “Naval Officers must also acquire knowledge about the shipboard routine of a combat unit at port and at sea, techniques and procedures for navigation, naval kinematics, and ship maneuverability to navigate safely with the support of electronic equipment, instruments, publications and nautical maps, as well as knowledge about the functional organization of a combat unit and guard duties at sea and in port.” The comprehensive training provided by the Peruvian Naval School places its Naval Cadets on par with their counterparts in the most important navies in the region, Capt. Saz García said. A learning experience A learning experience “Here we are learning to apply everything we learned in the classroom; we are shown what real life is like during maneuvers, how demanding they are, what relationships with the crew are like, and it gives us a broad overview of the place where we will soon be working,” Cadet Ensign Bartra said. The comprehensive training provided by the Peruvian Naval School places its Naval Cadets on par with their counterparts in the most important navies in the region, Capt. Saz García said. “During their coursework, the knowledge they obtain gives them intensive training in Naval Sciences, complemented by their knowledge of engineering and the humanities.” It’s good to read the latest news The training of our future naval officers in Peru is good. My congratulations and for the opportunities of their lives these youths of the future have in our excellent Navy. Constant training of our military personnel is the best national security policy.last_img read more

first_imgRelatedPosts Mane double eases Liverpool to win over 10-man Chelsea EPL: Chelsea, Liverpool in cagey duel Chelsea sink Brighton to make winning start Chelsea have reportedly identified Queens Park Rangers midfielder Eberechi Eze as a potential addition during the January transfer window. With their transfer ban having previously been lifted, Chelsea are free to make new signings at the midway point of the campaign, armed with funds raised from the sales of Eden Hazard and Alvaro Morata. While Frank Lampard is said to be eyeing established world-class players, it appears that the Blues are also considering moves for prospects who they feel have the potential to make the step-up at Stamford Bridge. According to the Daily Mail, Chelsea hold an interest in Eze after the playmaker’s impressive performances for QPR in the Championship. The 21-year-old has contributed nine goals and four assists this season, leading to the youngster being regarded as one of the top talents outside of the Premier League. Eze has just over 18 months remaining on his contract at Loftus Road.Tags: Alvaro MorataChelseaEbere EzeEden Hazardlast_img read more

first_imgLiverpool bank on stability over signings to end 30-year title waitLiverpool, United Kingdom | AFP | Missing out on the Premier League title despite a record-breaking campaign was eased by winning a sixth European Cup for Liverpool last season, but ending a 30-year wait to be crowned English champions is now more important than ever on Merseyside.Jurgen Klopp’s men are expected to strike first blood in the title race when they kick off the Premier League season against newly-promoted Norwich under the Friday night lights of Anfield.However, unlike most of their competitors who have delved into the arms race for talent in another transfer window where Premier League clubs have spent over £1 billion ($1.2 billion), the European champions have been conspicuously quiet in the transfer market.Teenage talents Sepp van den Berg and Harvey Elliott have been snapped up with an eye to the future, while Spanish goalkeeper Adrian will replace Simon Mignolet as back-up to Alisson Becker in three low-key arrivals.Klopp, though, believes the foundations are already in place for another tilt at the title after spending over £230 million in the past two years on the likes of Alisson, Virgil van Dijk and Mohamed Salah.“You should never do transfers because other clubs are doing transfers,” Klopp told Sky Sports.“That makes no sense, it’s not about that. And if you sit back for a second and have a look at the squad, do we need more players?”On the evidence of last season, there is precious little for Liverpool to improve on. – Man City set the bar –A Premier League points tally of 97 would have won the title in any season bar the last two as Manchester City have set a new bar under Pep Guardiola.City have further strengthened the squad that won a first ever domestic treble of trophies in England last season with the club record signing of Spanish midfielder Rodri and will be the benchmark for Liverpool to beat.A 1-1 draw between the sides, with City edging a penalty shootout 5-4, in the Community Shield last weekend again highlighted how little there is to separate the English and European champions.Yet, in contrast to last season when Liverpool were the least affected of England’s big six by the late return to pre-season of players at the World Cup, Klopp has a tougher time in ensuring his side hit the ground running.The prolific front three of Salah, Roberto Firmino and Sadio Mane were all involved in international tournaments again this summer.Liverpool have decided against investing heavily in back-up for that trio and their presence was missed in a bumpy pre-season that saw an under-strength side beaten by Borussia Dortmund, Sevilla and Napoli.But Klopp believes the squad he has assembled will be bolstered by Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, Adam Lallana and Rhian Brewster’s return to fitness, while Naby Keita can have a bigger impact in his second season in English football.“People think that players from other clubs, other countries, are better than the players we have here but without really having the proof, because those players haven’t played here,” he said.“It means whoever wants to start has to be at his top level. We have proper competition and that’s exactly what you need.”Winning the Champions League also booked Liverpool’s place in next week’s UEFA Super Cup and Club World Cup in December, meaning they have five trophies to play for this season.However, it is ending 30 years of hurt by winning a 19th league title come May that will determine whether Liverpool’s season has been a success or failure.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more