first_img “COPY” Year:  Houses Architects: Shinichi Ogawa & Associates Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/536934/o-residence-shinichi-ogawa-and-associates Clipboard Save this picture!Courtesy of Shinichi Ogawa & Associates+ 29 Share O Residence / Shinichi Ogawa & AssociatesSave this projectSaveO Residence / Shinichi Ogawa & Associates CopyHouses•Japan 2014 ArchDaily Japan Area:  298 m² Area:  298 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project O Residence / Shinichi Ogawa & Associates Year:  Projects “COPY” Photographs 2014 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/536934/o-residence-shinichi-ogawa-and-associates Clipboard Photographs:  Courtesy of shinichi ogawa & associatesStructural System :reinforced concreteSite Area:159 sqmCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!Courtesy of Shinichi Ogawa & AssociatesRecommended ProductsDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Curved Hinged Door | AlbaDoorsAir-LuxPivoting DoorDoorspanoramah!®ah! PivotText description provided by the architects. In spite of standing in a central dense urban area of Tokyo, this house is privileged to have a very nice landscape to enjoy.
Like 3 box-culverts sitting on top of each other, the building of 12mx9mx9m displays a very pure expression. The volume is closed all around, except in the one façade that overlooks a green scenery, which is totally open to the exterior.Save this picture!Courtesy of Shinichi Ogawa & AssociatesIn the first floor there is a garage space, the second is taken by the LDK, while the third floor accomodates the private spaces: the master and child bedrooms, and one deep bathroom, with the bathtub being right next to the window and the outside nature. All these spaces are related through a long corridor that also works as a walk-in- closet.Save this picture!Courtesy of Shinichi Ogawa & AssociatesSave this picture!Courtesy of Shinichi Ogawa & AssociatesThe LDK was designed in order to be one big white minimal space, with only one counter of 9m long, that is topped by one continuous lamp light on the ceiling.
The big windows of 12m wide become a very important element of the project, as they bring the different seasonal environments into the interior living of the house, transforming the rational design into a space full of expression. All the different floors are connected through two stairways that face each other on a very narrow but high ceiling space of the building, which is enlightened from the top, through a subtle and thin slit.
The extreme minimal composition of this house responds in the most silent way to its compact and intricate urban setting, and seeks for a maximum enjoyment of its main asset: the beautiful exterior landscape.Save this picture!Courtesy of Shinichi Ogawa & AssociatesProject gallerySee allShow lessFirst Job Hunt: Does Size Matter?ArticlesHouse by the Lake / Marte.Marte ArchitectsSelected Projects Share CopyAbout this officeShinichi Ogawa & AssociatesOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHousesJapanPublished on August 13, 2014Cite: “O Residence / Shinichi Ogawa & Associates” 13 Aug 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BronzeArmchairsAndreu WorldGrand Raglan – Lounge ChairSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Frequency® FL-SeriesPlantingSikaGreen RoofsStonesCosentinoSilestone Surfaces – Ethereal CollectionMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 8″Panels / Prefabricated AssembliesFranken-SchotterFacade Panels – Dietfurt LimestoneWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusWoodGustafsWood Cladding in St. Erik Eye HospitalLightsKKDCLighting – Groove FLEXMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

first_imgColumnsCoronavirus And Constitution: The Supreme Court’s Free Testing Order Gautam Bhatia11 April 2020 11:10 PMShare This – xThe coronavirus pandemic is a question of public health, but it is also a question of equality. Crucial dimensions of this crisis will be missed if it is framed only as a question of public health. The migrant labour issue – discussed in the last post – presents this starkly, but so does the issue of testing. In an interim order passed yesterday, a Supreme Court bench of Ashok Bhushan and…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe coronavirus pandemic is a question of public health, but it is also a question of equality. Crucial dimensions of this crisis will be missed if it is framed only as a question of public health. The migrant labour issue – discussed in the last post – presents this starkly, but so does the issue of testing. In an interim order passed yesterday, a Supreme Court bench of Ashok Bhushan and S. Ravindra Bhat JJ directed that testing for Covid-19 in India would be free. The order was subjected to criticism through the course of the day, and it now appears that private labs will move Court for a modification.Before moving on to the Order itself, it is important to clear two points. The first is that the Order does not mean that anyone can walk into any private lab and get a free test. The ICMR Guidelines for testing determine who is eligible for a Covid-19 test, and – at the time of writing – they remain stringent.The second point is that there is indeed force in the criticism that the Supreme Court’s order is unclear over who foots the bill for the free tests. To me, it appears an elementary point that it is the State, and therefore, it is a matter of some surprise that the Order leaves that bit to be worked out for later. As many critics pointed out yesterday, private labs – especially smaller ones – are unlikely to be in a position to test for free, and government reimbursements themselves are often delayed. Consequently, to prevent the unintended consequence of making testing more difficult, a mechanism of compensation should have been worked out in the Order itself.That said, the core thrust of the Order – that Covid-19 testing should be free – is entirely legitimate. It is not judicial encroachment into the policy domain, and it is not a violation of the separation of powers. To understand why, let us recall that the government had capped the cost of testing at Rs. 4,500 for private labs – i.e., private labs could charge upto that amount for carrying out a Covid-19 test. Now consider that in light of the following facts:Covid-19 is a pandemic, and a public health crisis so grave that the entire country is in lockdown.The WHO has noted that the best way to contain Covid-19 is “test, test, test”; there is official guidance, therefore, that testing is indispensable to solving the crisis.A cap price of Rs. 4,500 for testing – in a situation where it is an admitted fact that there is not enough government capacity – essentially means that wealth and economic class determines who can get tested and who can’t.The consequences of not getting tested are:Potentially not undertaking the very specific set of processes that enhance the likelihood of getting out of the pandemic unscathed. For example, there is guidance at this point that if you have fever brought on by Covid-19, you should take Paracetamol and not Ibuprofen. Furthermore, if one’s condition deteriorates, and one needs to go the hospital, a Covid-19 diagnosis will – at that stage – require specific treatment.As is well known, Covid-19 spreads unless very specific measures are taken with respect to self-isolation and quarantining. Consequently, an untested, positive Covid-19 person is not only putting themselves in danger, but also the people around them.This makes clear that the issue of testing is not simply a “right to health” issue under Article 21, but a core Article 14 issue: a price-based Covid-19 test disproportionately impacts not just individual people who cannot afford it, but the people around them as well. In a situation of lockdown, where travel is effectively forbidden, the implication of this is that the danger is disproportionately served upon low-income clusters of people.It should therefore be clear that the only possible alternative is State-funded free Covid-19 testing, subject to ICMR Guidelines on who can be tested, and when. After all, if the State cannot ensure virus testing to those who need it in the middle of a global pandemic, what is the point of a State in the first place – and what is the point of rights if you can’t even get yourself diagnosed in a global pandemic because you can’t afford testing? Seen from this perspective, it should be clear that the Supreme Court’s order was morally, ethically, and constitutionally justified.Views Are Personal Only.This article was first published here Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

first_img Saints’ CEO Gareth Rogers told the club’s official website: “Ryan is a young, attacking full-back and will fit in perfectly with the club’s philosophy and style of play. “This is another important step forward in terms of rebuilding our first-team squad with exciting English talent at its core.” First-team manager Ronald Koeman added: “I’m very happy to be able to bring Ryan in. “I spoke to him on Monday afternoon and I was very impressed with his attitude and how keen he was to play games for Southampton. “He is a top player who will bring a lot of quality to the team. He has experience at the highest level and is an exciting, attacking player, which is what I like to see in my full-backs.” The Bertrand loan move is welcome news for Southampton fans who have seen a succession of players leave the Barclays Premier League club since eighth place was secured in May. Bertrand is expected to take Luke Shaw’s place at left-back, following the latter’s move to Manchester United. Adam Lallana, Rickie Lambert and Dejan Lovren have all moved to Liverpool, while Calum Chambers has joined Arsenal. Southampton have pocketed almost £100million for the combined deals, with chairman Ralph Krueger refuting reports that Jay Rodriguez and Morgan Schneiderlin would also be leaving. Press Association Sport understands the south-coast club have the option to buy Bertrand outright next summer. Bertrand has been with the Blues since 2006 but has found action hard to come by, spending last season on loan at Aston Villa. It is understood the deal could be worth up to £10million, should Southampton choose to make the move for Bertrand a permanent one. Press Association Sport understands the next transfer movement at Southampton is likely to see club-record signing Dani Osvaldo depart for Inter Milan. Having joined last summer from Roma, the 28-year-old spent the second half of last season on loan with Juventus after headbutting team-mate Jose Fonte in training. Osvaldo is set to depart Saints on loan again, heading for the San Siro in a deal which will see Saphir Taider come the other way. The 22-year-old Algeria international joined from Bologna last summer and will spend this season at St Mary’s. Southampton have announced the signing of Chelsea left-back Ryan Bertrand on a season-long loan. Press Associationlast_img read more